diversity

Second annual publication of findings from Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study. 'Understanding society' is a major social science investment in longitudinal studies with potentially huge long-term implications for social science and other research and for the understanding of the UK in the early twenty-first century. It provides valuable new evidence about the people of the UK, their lives, experiences, behaviours and beliefs, and enables an unprecedented understanding of diversity within the population.

This report combines a review of relevant literature with an in-depth look at research practice to examine the extent to which socially diverse populations have been, or might be, reflected in research. The report had a focus on health promotion and public health research with children and young people but its key messages are relevant to research in all topics with a range of age groups.

This research addresses the increasing need for research to inform policy and practice development that is sensitive to the diversity of the UK's multiethnic population. Emphasis was given to the importance of ensuring that any guidance developed and promoted should be regularly appraised in light of the evolving social world and ethical and scientific standards. Research published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation in March 2011.

This review adopts a ‘capability-based’ approach to equality, analysing older people with high support needs from different equality groups and highlighting relevant debates associated to equality and diversity.

Drawing on a range of reports, statistics and conversations with 13 experts, it presents: the equality profile of older people with high support needs; equality and diversity issues in accessing and experiencing services; the gaps in the evidence base; and a summary of the key debates and recommendations to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Interpersonal communication in health and social care services is by its nature diverse. As a consequence, achieving good or effective communication – whether between service providers and service users, or among those working in a service – means taking account of diversity, rather than assuming that every interaction will be the same. This unit explores the ways in which difference and diversity impact on the nature of communication in health and social care services.

Sarah Cunningham-Burley is Professor of Medical and Family Sociology Public Health Sciences and Co-director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships at the University of Edinburgh. She is involved in a range of research, including the Growing Up Scotland cohort study and new qualitative longitudinal study of work and family life. She also conducts research on the social aspects of genetics and stem cell research and is a member of the UK government's Human Genetics Commission.

This discussion paper considers the characteristics of social care organisations that successfully promote diversity, and explores research on the barriers to promoting diversity and how they can be overcome.

This resource offers general useful advice on the diversity between different cultures and religions. It focuses on the ways in which different cultures think about issues such as personal care, family planning, childbirth, medical intervention, as well as death and dying.

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000. It set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (including Asperger’s syndrome) to lead a full life, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

This report documents a lecture presented by Professor Ash Amin from Durham University, with a response from Matt Matravers, Director of the School of Politics, Economics, and Philosophy at University of York. The lecture discusses living with diversity and the role of cities in managing cultural difference.