childrens rights

Paper that considers how the Common Weal can connect to children and young people’s concepts of social justice. It considers children and young people’s experiences, in light of the Christie Commission’s call for public service provision to confront inequalities.

The paper poses questions about the extent to which children and young people will be involved in, and be able to define, the Common Weal.

Study undertaken from a feminist and children's rights perspective that emerged from the growing body of literature on children's experiences of domestic abuse, the challenges of childhood studies and the opportunities arising out of the changed socio-political landscape of Scotland since devoltion.

A programme run by the Scottish Universities Insight Institute (SUII).  

The key objectives of this project are to:

The first in a series of four seminars. It introduced the concept of intersectionality and debates its meanings and purposes for understanding childhood identities and inequalities. It explored the different ways in which this framework can be put into practice by practitioners and policy makers. The seminar involved a combination of short presentations, group discussions and a plenary conversation and addressed the following questions:

This research project was commissioned by Scottish Government Children and Families Analysis with the objective of undertaking an in-depth analysis of data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to examine the circumstances and outcomes of children living with a disability in Scotland. The overall aim of this analysis was to explore the impact of disability on the child, their parents and the wider family unit.

This booklet gives young people practical help and advice about dealing with bullying behaviour.It has been developed by respectme, Scotland’s Anti-
Bullying Service, and has been put together in partnership with ChildLine and children and young people. It’s designed to give children and young people the confidence and skills to make better choices when dealing with bullying situations.

Report that gives the views of young people who are about to leave boarding schools for adult life, of residential students in further education colleges, and of care leavers, about learning and preparing for life as independent adults. It compares the views of those moving into independent adulthood from these very different backgrounds.

Update to 'Do the Right Thing' - the Scottish Government's 2009 response to the 2008 concluding observations from the UN committee on the Rights of the Child.

Assessment that examines the effect that welfare reforms introduced since 2010 has had on children’s right to a decent standard of living and the potential effects of proposed changes within the Welfare Reform Bill 2012.

The rights of children and young people are set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). The Convention sets out what a child can expect from others as a result of their government’s commitment to respect their rights.

The Scottish Government has made a commitment to make sure that the UNCRC is a reality in Scotland – that children’s rights are recognised and their voices heard and listened to.

This document proposes that 'Getting it right for every child' will help make the UNCRC a reality for children and young people in Scotland.