race relations

This project was commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission in December 2009 with the aim of providing an insight into identity-based bullying of young people in schools and in the wider community, and examining the preventative and responsive strategies currently being used to address it in local authorities across England, Scotland and Wales.

This site provides access to the text of Home Office Findings 222 which was published in February 2004. It presents the findings of a survey of race and parole which analysed 6,208 decisions made by the Parole Board between 1999-2000. Topics considered include: whether there is evidence of institutional racial discrimination in parole decision making.

Report summarising the findings of a study which explored the attitudes and aspirations of young people who had been permanently excluded form school, those from ethnic minority groups and those leaving local authority care. The study's purpose was to use this data to help identify unseen barriers to success facing these young people.

Briefing paper discussing the subjects of current literature and theory on racially motivated and hate crimes, the legal response to crimes of race and hate and community responses to racially motivated crime and the implications for Scottish social policy.

This resource is the Catalyst website, which looks at new thinking on race relations and racial equality today, both in Britain and abroad.

Catalyst focuses on race, identity, citizenship, culture and community, and how these concepts are continually evolving and re-shaping the society we live in.

This booklet is entitled Race Equality through Leadership in Social Care. Research has shown that organisations that are successful in this area of diversity are in that position because of effective leadership. This booklet does not question the leader’s commitment to race equality but acknowledges that the provision of culturally sensitive services and supportive employment practices can be very challenging.

The Institute of Race Relations (IRR) was established as an independent educational charity in 1958 to carry out research, publish and collect resources on race relations throughout the world. Since 1972, the IRR has concentrated on responding to the needs of Black people and making direct analyses of institutionalised racism in Britain and the rest of Europe. Today, the Institute of Race Relations is at the cutting edge of the research and analysis that informs the struggle for racial justice in Britain and internationally.

Report presenting an historical analysis of the development of race related training and the findings of a survey of race equality training in mental health services in England. It concludes there is a need for a more strategic approach to this training which includes national standards which govern both the nature of training and the selection of training providers.