physical restraint

This learning activity is a Social Care Institute for Excellence SCIE e-learning resource. These elearning resources are freely available to all. They provide audio, video and interactive technology to assist in exploring the nature of managing risk and minimising restraint when working with older people in care homes. The resources also support learning and teaching for the Health and Social Care Diploma, levels 3 and 4. Resource published in 2009.

Staff in care homes for older people can be confused as to what constitutes restraint, and unsure how to balance their responsibilities to residents with the rights of residents to make their own decisions. This report is based on a selection of literature that addresses these questions, as well as considering how, when and why restraint is used. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in October 2009.

Detail of the submission to Lord Carlile of Berriew QC's 2011 public hearing on the use of force on children in custody, with a view to implementing and enforcing a much better children's rights system.

This briefing examines the sanctioned use of force on children in custody and includes evidence from legal statements made by young people and used here with their consent.

The briefing has been produced by the Howard League legal team which represents children and young adults in custody.

Research carried out by User Voice which presents the stark reality of some young people’s experience of being physically restrained by staff in the secure juvenile estate.

This resource explores: how staff, residents and relatives view of risk and risk-taking will influence decisions about restraint; how making good decisions about restraint is more likely if care staff are positive, show teamwork, keep good records, are aware of the alternatives to restraint and have some basic knowledge of the law on restraint; and how a careful five-step process can help when making difficult decisions about restraint: observe, do some detective work, come to a collective decision, implement and review the plan.

This resource explores the ideas that: restraint can be a difficult issue in care homes, and the word means different things to different people; there are many different types of restraint, ranging from active physical interventions to failing to assist a person; minimising the use of restraint is important, but sometimes it will be the right thing to do; and knowing the individual, valuing the views of relatives and working as a team will help reduce the need for restraint.

It is well known that disabled people face additional costs to enable them to meet their needs. However, there has been no clear evidence about the true extent of these costs. This research, conducted by the Centre for Research in Social Policy with the support of Disability Alliance, presents budget standards for groups of disabled people who have different needs arising from physical or sensory impairments.

A Care Commission publication which reviews practice in residential care services for young people, concerning protecting children, planning for their care and using physical restraint.

Staff in care homes for older people can be confused as to what constitutes restraint, and unsure how to balance their responsibilities to residents with the rights of residents to make their own decisions. This report is based on a selection of literature that addresses these questions, as well as considering how, when and why restraint is used.