youth courts

Summary of the main findings of research which looked at the Legal Representation Grant Scheme, a scheme which permits children's hearings to appoint legally qualified individuals to represent children when this is required. The purpose was to review the operation of the scheme and inform its future development.

Report summarising the main findings of research which looked at the Legal Representation Grant Scheme, a scheme which permits children's hearings to appoint legally qualified individuals to represent children when this is required. The purpose was to review the operation of the scheme and inform its future development.

This report by the Improving the Effectiveness of the Youth Justice System Working Group describes the characteristics of effective local management of youth justice services and outlines a set of standards to improve delivery.

The group was asked to develop a strategic framework of national objectives and standards for Scotland’s Youth Justice services, to help achieve the national target of reducing the number of persistent offenders by 10% by 2006.

The Kilbrandon report was, and still remains, one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'. Though it is now over thirty years since it was first published, current debate about child care practices and polices in Scotland still resonates with principles and philosophies derived from the Kilbrandon Report itself.

Action programme aimed at children and young people up to the age of 16 who are offending and at those 17 year olds who are under a statutory supervision requirement. It recognises the need for a more integrated approach between the youth justice and adult criminal justice systems. This report sets out proposals to identify the first steps in achieving this.

This review explores the work of the hearings and criminal justice systems and sets out the Scottish Executive's assessment of and its recommendations to improve these youth systems.

Paper examining the changing trends in the U.S. youth justice system since the end of the nineteenth century and arguing that a new model should be constructed for the 21st century based on the concept of placing young offenders in an intermediate category, separate from children and adults.

In 1998 Labour made significant reforms to the youth justice system. A decade later these have failed to reduce offending. This report proposes ways in which the youth justice system could reduce offending, as well as ways of creating public confidence in the system. Contents include: why we need a new approach to youth justice; a tale of two targets - why a new approach is needed; objectives, barriers to, and new principles of youth justice; can a new direction be preventative?; will the public support popular preventionism?