evidence

Research that aims to review the existing evidence and practice surrounding victims’ support needs, outcome measurement and quality assurance in the victim support sector, to assess: 

  • the support needs of victims
  • the effectiveness of interventions to support victims
  • how to develop victim outcome measures or indicators
  • how to measure victim outcomes
  • how to measure and assess quality in support service provision. 

Learning resource that has been produced to help students and practitioners of social care and social work make more effective and extensive use of research in their studies and in practice.

Review that provides an introduction to the different ways in which qualitative research has been used in social care and some of the reasons why it has been successful in identifying under-researched areas, in documenting the experiences of people using services, carers, and practitioners, and in evaluating new types of service or intervention.

A Rapid Evidence Assessment was conducted to systematically review the UK and international literature to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for persistent and prolific offenders in reducing re-offending behaviour. The review, conducted by the Centre for Criminal Justice Economics and Psychology and the EPPI-Centre and funded by the Ministry of Justice, addressed one key question: Do criminal justice interventions for persistent/prolific offenders lead to a reduction in offending?

Concern has been expressed about the possibility of inappropriate disclosure and use of intimate images obtained during the forensic medical examination of complainants of sexual violence or abuse.

This guidance is intended to create an agreed practice and disclosure framework in order to reassure practitioners and complainants. This guidance applies to all intimate forensic medical examinations

Paper that brings together the Action for Children evidence base on intensive family support services. It is collated under a number of themes:

- keeping children safe
- keeping young people safety at home/out of care
- keeping children out of custody
- keeping children healthy
- improving children's relationships
- savings to the state and communities
- improving educational attainment
- reducing anti-social behaviour
- housing stability

This resource has been designed to support you to meet the 12 outcomes statements contained in the NQSW framework in adult services developed by Skills For Care. You will find useful resources, suggestions for evidence and links to current legislation and policy to help your continuing professional development. Although the primary focus is on adult services, social workers in other settings will also find it useful.

These rules set out the procedures governing the constitution, arrangement and decision-making of children’s hearings. The rules consolidate and amend the Children's Hearings (Scotland) Rules 1986 taking into account the new provisions introduced by the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 and the Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

These Rules permit legal representatives to attend Children's Hearings in certain circumstances. They also specify when the Children's Hearing may consider the appointment of a legal representative, and the circumstances in which an appointment may be made.

They authorise the Principal Reporter to make copies of the relevant documentation available to legal representatives and also specifies groups of persons from whom a legal representative may be appointed.