legal proceedings

Guide aimed primarily at practitioners working in various settings for organisations involved in safeguarding. It may also be useful for volunteers, family.

It aims to equip practitioners with information about how to assist and safeguard people. Knowing about the legal basis is fundamental, because the law defines the extent and limits of what can be done to help people and to enable people to keep themselves safe.

Briefing paper which revisits the recommendations and identifies progress made on 'Measuring up'. It also highlights where further action is needed.

It is based on discussions at two seminars held in June and September 2010 and a review of current criminal justice business plans and ‘Big Society’ policy pronouncements. The seminars were attended by senior members of the judiciary, legal profession and civil service.

The Act, in tandem with the International Criminal Court Act 2001 ('the UK Act'), will enable the United Kingdom to ratify the Statute of the International Criminal Court, which was adopted on 17 July 1998 at Rome.

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.

These rules set out the procedures governing the constitution, arrangement and decision-making of children’s hearings. The rules consolidate and amend the Children's Hearings (Scotland) Rules 1986 taking into account the new provisions introduced by the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 and the Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

These Rules permit legal representatives to attend Children's Hearings in certain circumstances. They also specify when the Children's Hearing may consider the appointment of a legal representative, and the circumstances in which an appointment may be made.

They authorise the Principal Reporter to make copies of the relevant documentation available to legal representatives and also specifies groups of persons from whom a legal representative may be appointed.

This feasibility study sought to examine how best to conceptualise and evaluate how decision-making in children’s lives takes due account of their views, with particular attention to processes related to Part I of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 and the implications for compliance with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC).

This Act of Scottish Parliament has two main purposes. These are to prevent the accused in a sexual offence case from personally cross-examining the complainer; and to strengthen the existing provisions restricting the extent to which evidence can be led regarding the character and sexual history of the complainer. The first purpose will be achieved by requiring the accused to be legally represented throughout his or her trial.

The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 brings together aspects of family, child care and adoption law that affect children. The Act seeks to incorporate the 3 key principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) – i.e. non- discrimination; a child’s welfare as a primary consideration; and listening to children’s views, into Scottish legislation and practice.