law

The purpose of this consultation paper is to explore how the law relating to the physical punishment of children can be modernised, so that it better protects children from harm. The aim of the consultation is to address two specific issues. First, within the context of a modern family policy, in a responsible society, where should we draw the line as to what physical punishment of children is acceptable within the family setting? Second, how do we achieve that position in law?

The ASP Act was passed by the Scottish Parliament in February 2007.

Part 1 of the Act requires councils to make enquiries to determine whether action is required to stop or prevent harm; requires specified public bodies to co-operate with councils; introduces a range of protection orders; and makes provision for the establishment of local multi-agency adult protection committees.

Document which focuses on what you should do if you have concerns about children, in order to safeguard and promote their welfare, including those who are suffering, or at risk of suffering, significant harm.

This resource also outlines what will happen once you have informed someone about those concerns; what further contribution you may be asked or expected to make to the processes of assessment, planning, working with children, including how you should share information.

This resource is an introduction to developing reflective practice and explores how reflective practice can support and aid learning.

Recordings of the speakers at the Fred Stone Memorial Conference on Child Mental Health and Law, Glasgow, 7 May 2010, organised by the University of Glasgow, Faculty of Medicine.

This resource is made up of four extracts related to social care, social work and the law. The extracts are stand-alone sections but follow on from each other to make up this unit. You will be introduced to five main themes that shape practice in the field of social care and social work. The aim of this unit is to enhance your understanding of the relationship between social work practice and the law.

This album tackles the complex relationships social workers experience in the wide spectrum of their work, from those with families affected by social deprivation to those with judges, lawyers and other members of the legal system. The tracks analyse the role of the family in Scottish life in relation to the many voluntary bodies that exist to assist and inform them, and the legal obligations of social workers. Participants from single mothers to solicitors presented their perspectives in a series of frank, informative interviews.

Scottish Government guidance elaborating on an amendment to child protection legislation which removes from the category of child care position the work carried out by a member of a Parent Council or other parent body and the work involving an activity primarily intended for people aged 18 or over in a school or further education institution.

This learning object is suitable especially for an opening module, as it provides an orientation into the subject and will stimulate debate on tricky legal and ethical issues. Introduction to Law sets out to make users aware of: the importance and relevance of Law; how interesting Law can be; the many ways that Law impacts upon our lives and work; the importance of Law to social work practice; and the connections between Law and social work values. 'Why Study Law' asks you to reflect upon how you see the Law through a 10 question quiz.