social welfare law

Paper that is the first instalment of a three-part series on welfare. It examines the impacts of the UK Government’s welfare cuts and reforms. Subsequent papers will look at how Scotland uses existing powers better to improve prospects for learning and work, as well as exploring the potential for additional powers and the principles which should underline a progressive approach to welfare.

Report that relates to Section 4 of the Act which places an obligation on Scottish Ministers to report to the Scottish Parliament over the next five years on the impact that the UK Welfare Reform Act is likely to have on people in Scotland.

It includes:

Research paper 11/48 published on 8 June 2011 by the House of Commons Library. This is an account of the House of Commons Committee Stage of the Welfare Reform Bill. It complements Research Papers 11/23 and 11/24, prepared for the Commons Second Reading debate.

Bill No 154 of Session 2010-11. RESEARCH PAPER 11/24 published 7 March 2011. The Welfare Reform Bill provides for the introduction of a “Universal Credit” to replace a range of existing means-tested benefits and tax credits for people of working age, starting from 2013. The Bill follows the November 2010 White Paper, Universal Credit: welfare that works, which set out the Government’s proposals for reforming welfare to improve work incentives, simplify the benefits system and tackle administrative complexity.

The UK Border Agency not only has responsibility for securing the border but also for identifying and removing those who have no right to be in the United Kingdom. This inspection focused on the effectiveness and efficiency of the UK Border Agency’s approach to removing families, taking account of its obligations to carry out its functions having regard to the need to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

This consultation dealt with the draft Adoption (Disclosure of Medical Information about Natural parents) (Scotland) Regulations. As these regulations are subject to affirmative Parliamentary procedures they will now be included in a single set of regulations with the Adoption (Disclosure of Information) (Scotland) Regulations.

In the fall of 2007, the North Carolina Division of Social Services launched a resource parent recruitment and retention project based on the strategies recommended by best practice and research.

This project concentrates on the application of broad but concrete steps that individual agencies can take to meet their specific needs, and it builds on the success of the North Carolina’s Multiple Response System and reinforces the strengths of our state’s child welfare system.

Over the last 10 years the role of Registered Social Landlords (RSLs) in Scottish social housing has increased dramatically. This report looks at four main areas of the sector’s work with homeless people: housing homeless households; preventing homelessness and sustaining tenancies; providing supported accommodation; and RSLs’ engagement in strategy development.

A look at the role of social housing for four generations of families since the Second World War. This study describes how housing for families has changed over time and explores the relationship between social housing, family circumstances and the 'adult outcomes' for children who grew up in social housing – i.e. their experiences when they are adults.