criminal law

An Act of the Scottish Parliament to amend the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 in various respects; to make provision about mental health disposals in criminal cases; to make provision as to the rights of victims of crime committed by mentally-disordered persons; and for connected purposes.

Report that presents the findings of a written consultation carried out by the Scottish Government on “Redesigning the Community Justice System”. The consultation took place between 20 December 2012 and 30 April 2013.

Online journal of primary criminology research papers written by some of the most up and coming criminologists in their fields.

Although these criminology papers are not anonymously peer reviewed, like those in the articles section of the journal, primary research papers are reviewed and edited by the General Editor and members of the Editorial Board to ensure they meet the high standards of the Internet Journal of Criminology.

Online journal including presentations by Rob Allen, Kathleen Marshall and original articles by Michele Burman on the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, by Jenny Johnstone and Vivian Leacock on Managing equality in the criminal justice process, and by Simon Mackenzie on game theory and the evolution of cooperation in criminal justice policy.

Briefing paper that has been prepared for criminal justice, healthcare and legal professionals and practitioners, members of the judiciary, and local government directors of adult and children’s services and lead members in England and Wales.

It will be of particular use to those working in liaison and diversion services in England and criminal justice liaison services in Wales; magistrates; defence lawyers and court staff.

The Scottish Government’s Making Justice Work Programme represents the most significant set of reforms to courts for more than a century. A central objective of the programme is to improve the experience of victims and witnesses, and a commitment has been made to to bring forward a Victims and Witnesses Bill during this Parliament.

In October 2010, the Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Kenny MacAskill MSP, decided that it was necessary to review key elements of Scottish criminal law and practice in the light of the decision of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Cadder

Bulletin that forms part of the Scottish Government series of statistical bulletins on the criminal justice system.

Statistics are presented on criminal proceedings concluded in Scottish courts and on a range of non-court disposals issued by the police and by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service during 2010-11.

One of six briefing papers covering various aspects of the Scottish criminal justice system. It outlines the way in which children who commit offences are dealt with, focussing on those under the age of 16.