criminal justice

‘Bromley Briefings’ produced in memory of Keith Bromley, a valued friend of the Prison Reform Trust and allied groups concerned with prisons and human rights.

His support for refugees from oppression, victims of torture and the falsely imprisoned made a difference to many people’s lives.

In October 2010, the Cabinet Secretary for Justice, Kenny MacAskill MSP, decided that it was necessary to review key elements of Scottish criminal law and practice in the light of the decision of the United Kingdom Supreme Court in Cadder

Report which is the result of a large scoping review of the research literature in an attempt to understand the many and complex reasons behind poor frontline service responses to adults with multiple needs, with a particular focus on those in contact with the criminal justice system.

Views of postgraduate students from the MRes Criminology, the MSC Criminology and Criminal Justice, and the MSc Transnational Crime, Justice and Security programmes at the University of Glasgow, who attended the annual Scottish Association for the Study of Offending (SASO) Conference held in Dunblane, Scotland, November 2011.

Bulletin that forms part of the Scottish Government series of statistical bulletins on the criminal justice system.

Statistics are presented on criminal proceedings concluded in Scottish courts and on a range of non-court disposals issued by the police and by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service during 2010-11.

The purpose of this review was to examine the available research evidence on criminal justice interventions in Scotland in terms of "effectiveness", (measured by rates of reconviction/reoffending, and reductions in drug use) and costs. The review also recognises the current policy emphasis on "recovery", which requires a wider acknowledgement of the possible mechanisms for measuring "success" and a wider vision for the process of recovery itself. It was undertaken between August and November 2010.

Audit that looks at the performance of the principal justice agencies through the eyes of the victims and witnesses who use them.

There are many aspects of our justice system that are very positive – for example, the fall in crime and anxiety, and rise in public confidence – but this audit shows that despite these changes, victims and witnesses are still not treated as well as they should be.

Final report, which reflects conclusions following well over 600 responses to our consultation and input from meetings in many parts of the country. We have also had the benefit of the Justice Select Committee’s report on the operation of the family courts, published in July. This final report aims to be a free standing document but does not analyse the issues facing the family justice system in the detail of the interim report. It sets out final recommendations for reform, highlighting where these have changed and where they have not.