youth justice

Action programme aimed at children and young people up to the age of 16 who are offending and at those 17 year olds who are under a statutory supervision requirement. It recognises the need for a more integrated approach between the youth justice and adult criminal justice systems. This report sets out proposals to identify the first steps in achieving this.

This review explores the work of the hearings and criminal justice systems and sets out the Scottish Executive's assessment of and its recommendations to improve these youth systems.

This research project, commissioned by the Scottish Government, looks at how advocacy for children in the Children's Hearings System compares with arrangements in other UK systems of child welfare and youth justice and those internationally, and what children and young people and the professionals who work with them think about advocacy arrangements in the Children's Hearings System and how these can be improved.

First in a series of lectures designed to honour the memory and achievement of Lord Kilbrandon, who wrote one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'.

The lecture concentrates on the system of juvenile justice.

Report giving an overview of the use of penalty notices for disorder for 10- to 15-year-olds in six pilot police force areas in England and Wales between July 2005 and June 2006.

In June 1998 the Government published “Speaking up for Justice”, a report of an Interdepartmental Working Group on the treatment of Vulnerable or Intimidated Witnesses in the Criminal Justice System. It proposed a coherent and integrated scheme to provide appropriate support and assistance for vulnerable or intimidated witnesses. This is a summary report of the key recommendations, legislation and implementation.

Paper examining the changing trends in the U.S. youth justice system since the end of the nineteenth century and arguing that a new model should be constructed for the 21st century based on the concept of placing young offenders in an intermediate category, separate from children and adults.

This resource is the fourth in a series of lectures designed to honour the memory and achievement of Lord Kilbrandon who wrote one of the most influential policy statements on how a society should deal with 'children in trouble'.

This lecture discusses the influence of a child's formative years on their subsequent adult behaviour and the role of the parent.

In 1998 Labour made significant reforms to the youth justice system. A decade later these have failed to reduce offending. This report proposes ways in which the youth justice system could reduce offending, as well as ways of creating public confidence in the system. Contents include: why we need a new approach to youth justice; a tale of two targets - why a new approach is needed; objectives, barriers to, and new principles of youth justice; can a new direction be preventative?; will the public support popular preventionism?