youth offending teams

This paper examines the links between early conduct problems and subsequent offending. It makes the case for greatly increased investment in evidence-based programmes to reduce the prevalence and severity of conduct problems in childhood.

This cross government document aims to help tackle youth crime and anti-social behaviour, and contribute to community safety in England. It sets out a strategic approach to inform the work of the Healthy Children, Safer Communities programme board to fulfil the vision that children and young people will be safer, healthier and stay away from crime.

Case study from Wiltshire describing a programme designed to support young offenders about to be released and provide them with assistance to find either employment or educational opportunities. Also offered are implementation tips for others interested in starting similar programmes.

Document reporting data from youth offending teams in England and Wales and the secure estate which is used to monitor the performance of the youth justice system and inform national, regional and local improvement initiatives.

Report identifying ten examples of crime reduction and prevention programmes which have proved effective and cost-effective in countries outwith the UK. These programmes address a combination of risk factors at each stage of a child's development and the report recommends similar programmes should be developed in the UK.

This is a review of the joint inspection programme of youth offending teams in England and Wales. it charts the evolution of youth offending work throughout this period, taking care to look at both the criminal justice and children's services elements. It gives a broad overview of the progress made over the five year period and comments on the programme of inspections with which it will be replaced.

Case study from Waltham Forest, London outlining the rationale and work involved in widening the remit of a youth offending team to include targeted/universal provision in education for communities as well as dealing with young offenders with a view to creating a more integrated service focused more on education and prevention. Implementation tips for others considering similar changes are also offered.

Report of a study which investigated the nature and extent of gun, gang and knife crime in England and Wales. It concludes that the nature of the threat from guns, gangs and knives is changing and recommends the UK Government change its approach to this issue in order to reduce the levels of gang violence.

In the last seven years the number of children locked up on remand has increased by 41%. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child says that imprisonment should only be used as a measure of last resort. This report on the overuse of remand for children is based on information gathered from a number of sources: interviews with senior practitioners and sentencers; a literature review of research and statistics; a survey of bail and remand officers; a national seminar. It discusses why the problem has arisen and presents a series of twelve policy and practice solutions.