restorative justice

Document providing guidance for agencies such as schools, police, anti-social behaviour teams, residential child care and social work on the principles, protocols and criteria for the use of restorative justice services in Scotland for children and young people and those harmed by their behaviour.

Guidance document produced to enable and encourage restorative justice practitioners in Scotland to provide a high quality service by laying down nationally recognised standards of best practice.

This report evaluates Hertfordshire County Council’s introduction of restorative justice in its young people’s residential units. It provides quantitative data about police call-outs to residential units before and after the introduction of restorative justice. It also presents qualitative data drawn from the experiences of young people living in residential units, as well as from the staff who work in them.

Document intended to provide guidance for practitioners on the principles and best practice for restorative justice services in the Children's Hearings system in Scotland with the aim of ensuring consistency and quality in these services.

Paper identifying and discussing some of the issues facing criminal and youth justice social work services in Scotland. These include effective practice and approaches, outcome evaluation, risk assessment, information management and restorative justice.

Restorative justice is a theory of justice that emphasizes repairing the harm caused or revealed by criminal behaviour. It is best accomplished through cooperative processes that include all stakeholders. Restorative justice theory and programs have emerged over the past 20 years as an increasingly influential world-wide alternative to criminal justice practice. This tutorial provides an overview of the movement and of the issues that it raises.

The Home Office's Restorative Justice web page outlines the Government's Restorative Justice Strategy. Restorative justice provides an opportunity for victims, offenders and sometimes representatives of the community to communicate about an offence and how to repair the harm caused. Victim participation is always voluntary, and offenders need to have admitted some responsibility for the harm they have caused.

In 1998 Labour made significant reforms to the youth justice system. A decade later these have failed to reduce offending. This report proposes ways in which the youth justice system could reduce offending, as well as ways of creating public confidence in the system. Contents include: why we need a new approach to youth justice; a tale of two targets - why a new approach is needed; objectives, barriers to, and new principles of youth justice; can a new direction be preventative?; will the public support popular preventionism?

Report that asks if and in what way devolution has led to a divergence in criminal justice policy and crime trends since the late 1930s.