young offenders

Document reporting data from youth offending teams in England and Wales and the secure estate which is used to monitor the performance of the youth justice system and inform national, regional and local improvement initiatives.

Report providing a review of the inspection activities of HMIP in Scotland as well as reporting on the issues of severe and enduring mental health problems in Scotland's prisons and young offenders in adult establishments.

Document providing guidance for agencies such as schools, police, anti-social behaviour teams, residential child care and social work on the principles, protocols and criteria for the use of restorative justice services in Scotland for children and young people and those harmed by their behaviour.

Report detailing results on reoffending - frequency, severity, actual and predicted - for juveniles (10-17yrs) released from custody or commencing a non-custodial court disposal or an out-of-court disposal in the first quarters of 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006.

The Key Elements of Effective Practice are intended to describe the features of effective interventions and provide the benchmark for effective practice. For the purposes of this publication, engagement covers the techniques that are concerned with gaining young people’s interest and willing participation in interventions or services intended to prevent or reduce offending. The guidance is structured to cover three main audiences: those involved in delivery, e.g.

This legislation sets out procedures for the prevention of crime and disorder with reference to: anti-social behaviour orders and youth crime; criminal law and racially aggravated offences; the criminal justice system and youth justice; dealing with offenders, specifically sexual offenders, those dependent on drugs and young offenders. Further procedure is laid out in respect of the detention, release and recall of prisoners and increased powers of arrest by the police.

The Scottish Children's Reporter Administration (SCRA) is the national body responsible for providing a world class care and justice system for all Scotland's children. SCRA became fully operational on 1st April 1996 and their main responsibilities are; to facilitate the work of Children's Reporters; to deploy and manage staff to carry out that work; and to provide suitable accommodation for Children's Hearings.

This research report addresses the perceptions of youth crime portrayed by the media and held by the public at large. It attempts to answer questions such as; has there been a change in levels of youth crime in recent years?; what is the current public perception of youth crime?; where perceptions of crime differ greatly from the reality, what are the underlying reasons for this? It seeks answers from the literature and self-report surveys, in particular, the British Crime Survey (BCS).

This guidance defines what is meant by a serious incident, the Youth Justice Board's system for reviewing serious incidents, how to notify the YJB of a serious incident, what needs to be done when a serious incident occurs, and how the YJB responds to a serious incident.

Information about the Children's Hearings system in Scotland, which takes most of the responsibility for dealing with children and young people under 16, and in some cases under 18, who commit offences or who are in need of care and protection.