young offenders

Report that presents analysis and evaluation of some of the factors that have led to the fall in the number of children under the age of 18 who are imprisoned in England and Wales. The figure has dropped from around 3,000 in the first half of 2008 to around 2,000 in the first four months of 2011.

Booklet, which is the fourth in a series, which offers 'tasters' of social science research projects, which have had an impact on public policy or social behaviour, and helped society to use some of the opportunities now available to address the challenges being faced. This one is based around why people turn to crime.

Thematic review, commissioned by the Youth Justice Board, which examines accommodation and education, training and employment (ETE) resettlement provision for sentenced young men aged 15 to 18 in young offender institutions.

It reports on the work carried out in custody to prepare young people for release, using survey data as well as indepth interviews with 61 sentenced young men, their case supervisors and follow-up information on what happened to them on release.

Summary of key findings from original research into the association between child sexual exploitation (CSE) and youth offending in Derby. Patterns of offending are explored, along with their implications for policy and practice.

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics. Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed. This Insight looks at intensive supervision, surveillance and monitoring of young people.

ISMS was launched in Glasgow, and six other Phase One sites, in April 2005, in order to provide a direct community-based alternative to secure care.

The purpose of this report is twofold. Firstly it comprises a short examination of the service, covering the period from 1st April 2007 to 31st March 2009 (following on from where the previous evaluation left off).

Targeted study undertaken by Qa Research (Qa) on behalf of Children & Young People Now magazine.

The resulting report examines the experiences of young people who are gang-affiliated or who have witnessed street gang activity. The views of professionals who support young people associated with gangs are also presented.

Annual report on crime and the impact of youth justice services in Glasgow for the period of 2009/10.

The safety and security of the law-abiding citizen is a key priority of the coalition government. Everyone has a right to feel safe in their home and in their community. When that safety is threatened, those responsible should face a swift and effective response. People rely on the criminal justice system to deliver that response: punishing offenders, protecting the public, and reducing reoffending.

This report presents key findings on gang membership and knife carrying amongst a cohort of young people based on data collected by the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime (ESYTC). The analysis was commissioned in light of a lack of quantitative data measuring the extent of gang membership and knife crime in Scotland.