young offenders

Notes from a seminar held on Monday 24th October 2011 at the Nuffield Foundation. The seminar took place as a round-table discussion attended by 28 policy makers, youth justice practitioners, researchers, specialists from children’s organisations and think-tanks. Sara Nathan OBE, a broadcaster and a member of the Judicial Appointments Commission as well as the Independent Commission on Youth Crime, chaired the meeting.

Paper that analyses the relationship between having one or more father figures and the likelihood that young people engage in delinquent criminal behaviour. It pays particular attention to distinguishing the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers.

The focus of the thematic review was on those aspects of casework which are unique to youth offenders or are particularly problematic.

These included:
• the quality of youth offender charging decisions including pre-court disposals
• the application of the ‘grave crime’ provisions and other related provisions under S51 Crime and Disorder Act 1998 as amended
• the quality of remand applications in respect of youth offenders
• the role of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in preventing offending.

Report that describes children and young people’s own perception of imprisonment. The seventh report to be published, it outlines the responses from surveys carried out annually in all young offender institutions holding children and young people aged 15 to 18 years old.

Findings are summarised from 1,052 young men from all nine male establishments and 40 young women from four female establishments.

Review that was launched in 2010 by the Minister of Justice, David Ford, in furtherance of the Hillsborough Castle Agreement. Undertaken by an independent team of three people, its terms of reference were to critically assess the current arrangements for responding to youth crime and make recommendations for how these might be improved within the wider context of, among other things, international obligations, best practice and financially uncertain future.

Evaluation of the pilot Up-2-Us Time for Change Project, which is a gender-specific service targeted at young women aged between 14 and 18 years deemed to be at significantly high risk of admission to secure care or custody.

The research takes a multi-dimensional perspective, by undertaking a set of qualitative interviews with young women attending the project, the professionals or stakeholders working with them as well as the practitioner’s of the Time for Change project itself.

Document which sets out the Youth Justice Board (YJB) plans for 2011-15, including its strategic objectives and specific aims for 2011/12. The aim of the youth justice system is to prevent offending and re-offending by children and young people.

One of six briefing papers covering various aspects of the Scottish criminal justice system. It outlines the way in which children who commit offences are dealt with, focussing on those under the age of 16.

Report that presents analysis and evaluation of some of the factors that have led to the fall in the number of children under the age of 18 who are imprisoned in England and Wales. The figure has dropped from around 3,000 in the first half of 2008 to around 2,000 in the first four months of 2011.