young offenders

Document which sets out the context of the inspecting year 2010-11, discusses the main issues, as well as other trends and the areas of special interest that were set out in the previous year.

This fact sheet 12 was published by the Youth Justice National Development Team at the Criminal Justice Social Work Development Centre (CJSW). It concerns the early and effective intervention for children and young people who offend.

The Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime is a programme of research that aims to address a range of fundamental questions about the causes of criminal and risky behaviours in young people.

The core of the programme is a major longitudinal study of a single cohort of around 4,000 young people who started secondary school in Edinburgh in the autumn of 1998.
 

Web page of publications produced by Apex Scotland. It includes annual reports and annual lectures.

Draft action plan that sets out how the Children, Young People and Offending sub group will contribute towards the implementation of the Northern Ireland Children and Young People’s Plan. This overall plan sets out that all CYPSP planning work will contribute towards a shift to early intervention, and to integration of resources from all possible sources in order to improve outcomes for children and young people.

The Transition to Adulthood (T2A) Alliance is a broad coalition of organisations, that evidences and promotes ‘the need for a distinct and radically different approach to young adults in the criminal justice system; an approach that is proportionate to their maturity and responsive to their specific needs.

The T2A Pathway identifies ten points in the criminal justice process where a more rigorous and effective approach for young adults and young people in the transition to adulthood (16-24) can be delivered.

The link between social breakdown and crime is well established. In the CSJ’s seminal report Breakthrough Britain, five common drivers of poverty and social breakdown were identified – educational failure, family breakdown, addiction, worklessness and economic dependency, and debt.

In February 2010, the CSJ launched a review of the youth justice system to identify how it might be reformed to improve outcomes for young people, victims and society.