sex offenders

Article that evaluates the effectiveness of current medical and psychological interventions for individuals at risk of sexually abusing children, both in known abusers and those at risk of abusing.

Research that presents the findings of research undertaken by an NSPCC Research Team from 2008–2010 with 27 adults convicted of sexual offences against children committed whilst in organisational positions of trust.

The primary aims of the research was to identify organisational risk factors and the way in which convicted sex offenders accessed organisations, in order to propose good practice in recruitment and within work settings with children and young people so that they can be better safeguarded against abuse and exploitation.

This thematic assessment was undertaken with four principle objectives:

1. Assess the size and scale of ‘localised grooming’ in proportion to the overall known picture of sexual exploitation
of children under the age of 18 in the UK
2. Establish any patterns of offending profile or victim experience
3. Assess the effectiveness of processes which might help identify such offending or potential victims
4. Recommend action to be taken to reduce the risk in future, including any urgent action that becomes apparent.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people’s experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland, based on 16,000 in-home face-to-face interviews conducted annually with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The results are presented in a series of reports including this one, which provides information on sexual victimisation and stalking.

The 2009/10 survey is the second sweep of the SCJS, with the first having been conducted in 2008/09.

This report is organised into six chapters and explores a range of issues including the approaches to risk assessment by different professional groups and the progress of validation in respect of the different risk assessment tools in use. Comment is made on risk assessment in action, who carries out risk assessments, how they are carried out and the mechanisms that are in place to ensure a consistent approach to risk assessment within organisations.

The aim of this Report was to develop a cohesive framework for dealing with sex offending. Some of the 73 recommendations build on the policies and processes already in place in order to strengthen existing measures aimed at protecting communities from sex offenders. Other recommendations support the introduction of new measures and new arrangements which will help to deliver a safer environment.

Recording of a Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar, 19 June 2008. Dr Robin Wilson, Clinical Director, Florida Civil Commitment Centre talking about rehabilitation of sex offenders.