prisoners

A functioning correctional system depends on the orderly reproduction of a stable and acceptable prison environment. The argument in this paper has two parts: first, a key factor in the social order of a prison is the legitimacy of the prison regime in the eyes of inmates; and second, the legitimacy of authorities depends in large part upon the procedural fairness with which officers treat prisoners.

This article reviews the evidence regarding young women’s involvement in violent crime and, drawing on recent research carried out in HMPYOI Cornton Vale in Scotland, provides an overview of the characteristics, needs and deeds of young women sentenced to imprisonment for violent offending. Through the use of direct quotations, the article suggests that young women’s anger and aggression is often related to their experiences of family violence and abuse, and the acquisition of a negative worldview in which other people are considered as being ‘out to get you’ or ‘put one over on you’.

Scotland is currently engaged in one of the biggest penal reform projects in a generation, seeking to fundamentally change its approach to punishment, which is characterised by high use of imprisonment compared to other parts of Europe, and the use of very short prison sentences. In Scotland around three quarters of prison sentences handed down by the courts are for six months or less. But because short sentences are seen as minimally intrusive compared to long-term or life sentences, there has been, until now, little research on their effects.

This resource is the Mental Health Primary Care in Prison website; a guide to mental ill health in adults and adolescents in prison and young offender institutions. Because the Prison Service in the UK has under its care one of the most vulnerable and mentally unhealthy populations anywhere, it requires mental-health services that are abundant and of high quality.

This resource introduces an interactive pathway through the criminal justice system and along the way highlights key professionals, their roles and responsibilities and key resources and services available.

Imprisonment for Public Protection is an indeterminate sentence given to offenders who are categorised as 'dangerous' but whose offences do not carry a life sentence. This report presents the findings of research carried out on the mental health of IPP prisoners and makes recommendations to address problems identified.

Report intended for policy makers interested in prison and sentencing reform. It presents evidence about the situation in Scotland and ideas for future policy development in Scotland. These ideas are based on research presented by academics at a seminar on sentencing reform held 12 December 2008.

This report presents the findings of a survey of the views and perceptions of 2,500 young people held in prison. Information is included on young people’s perceptions of their conditions and treatment, from their transfer to the establishment to their preparation for release. The results for young women, young men, and those from black and minority ethnic backgrounds are discussed separately.

Report highlighting the part which sentencing has played in the increase in the prison population in Scotland and identifying factors which may discourage sentencers from using custody and encourage them to make use of alternatives to custodial sentences.

Paper advocating some first steps in reforming primary care in prisons in England so that the UK Government's policy of 'equivalence', whereby prisoners receive health care in prison which is equivalent to that they would receive outside, can be better achieved.