ex-offenders

Paper that offers an ex-offender's viewpoint on the outlook of many young people today, or what is termed 'Social Deprivation Mindset'. The author also suggests that the criminal justice system should place most of their emphasis on changing the mindset of problematic individuals, rather than placing most of their efforts on challenging their re-offending.

Web page of publications produced by Apex Scotland. It includes annual reports and annual lectures.

The Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion is an independent, not for profit organisation dedicated to promoting social justice, social inclusion and tackling disadvantage. They work with the public sector, voluntary organisations, business and trade unions. They develop policy and strategy in a variety of fields and work closely with the Government to implement ideas. They also work with people delivering policy on the ground. This broad range of contacts lends a unique perspective to their work.

This podcast, part of the Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar series held in Glasgow on the 4th July 2008, in order to explain the launch of "So You Think You Know Me?" book, by Allan Weaver. The book is an autobiography of an ex-offender and former inmate of Barlinnie Prison, now a social work team-leader in his native Scotland.

This working paper reviews the evidence on the impact of the last three economic recessions on the PSA 8 (indicator 2) disadvantaged groups (that is, disabled people, ethnic minorities, lone parents, people aged 50 and over, the 15 per cent lowest qualified, and those living in the most deprived local authority wards), as well as ex-offenders and the self-employed.

This report presents the findings from an exploratory qualitative study that centres on a key Department for Work and Pensions client group that until now has not been extensively researched in terms of its interaction with benefit and employment services and the labour market. It focuses on a cohort of 40 (male) ex-prisoners who were tracked over a six-month period following their release from prison.

In a contribution to the JRF's 'social evils' series, Chris Creegan focuses on the social evils of British society experienced by people whose voices are not usually heard. The research used workshops/discussion groups with lone parents, ex-offenders, unemployed and other vulnerable and socially excluded people to explore their personal experiences of living and coping with social evils. Suggestions for overcoming them point to both individual and collective responsibility.