prisons

Breaking the cycle: effective punishment, rehabilitation and sentencing of offenders

The safety and security of the law-abiding citizen is a key priority of the coalition government. Everyone has a right to feel safe in their home and in their community. When that safety is threatened, those responsible should face a swift and effective response. People rely on the criminal justice system to deliver that response: punishing offenders, protecting the public, and reducing reoffending.

Legitimacy and procedural justice in prisons

A functioning correctional system depends on the orderly reproduction of a stable and acceptable prison environment. The argument in this paper has two parts: first, a key factor in the social order of a prison is the legitimacy of the prison regime in the eyes of inmates; and second, the legitimacy of authorities depends in large part upon the procedural fairness with which officers treat prisoners.

User views of punishment: the comparative experience of short prison sentences and community based punishments

Scotland is currently engaged in one of the biggest penal reform projects in a generation, seeking to fundamentally change its approach to punishment, which is characterised by high use of imprisonment compared to other parts of Europe, and the use of very short prison sentences. In Scotland around three quarters of prison sentences handed down by the courts are for six months or less. But because short sentences are seen as minimally intrusive compared to long-term or life sentences, there has been, until now, little research on their effects.

Young people behaving badly (Radio 4 series: Woman's Hour)

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how we should deal with young people behaving badly. In July 2004, the Government announced its new five year plan to tackle crime. Since then there's been much talk of sweeping the streets clean of yobs and cracking down on young offenders. But what is the most effective way of dealing with bad behaviour by young people?

Prisons; Sex culture (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments, the first on prisons. Laurie Taylor visits England’s oldest prison, the Tower of London, to talk to ex-prison governor and criminologist, Professor David Wilson, about a new project whose aim is to bring fans of prison drama into contact with penal experts and reformers.

Circles of Support and Accountability for Released Sex Offenders in Canada: an Evaluation

Recording of a Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar, 19 June 2008. Dr Robin Wilson, Clinical Director, Florida Civil Commitment Centre talking about rehabilitation of sex offenders.

Inside out : the case for improving mental healthcare across the criminal justice system

Report describing the obstacles to court diversion schemes for offenders with mental health problems in England and Wales and arguing that early and more structured interventions by the health care and justice systems would improve care and reduce the cost of crime. It identifies examples of good practice in this area in England and Wales and points to the potential of a new model in mental health courts.

So You Think You Know Me?

This podcast, part of the Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar series held in Glasgow on the 4th July 2008, in order to explain the launch of "So You Think You Know Me?" book, by Allan Weaver. The book is an autobiography of an ex-offender and former inmate of Barlinnie Prison, now a social work team-leader in his native Scotland.

How unwanted acts become crimes (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the way in which unwanted acts can become crimes. The relationship between levels of crime and fear of crime continues to exercise academics and policy makers alike. The question is asked if soaring prison populations accurately reflect the former or the latter. Laurie Taylor is joined by Nils Christie, Professor of Criminology at the University of Oslo, who argues that crime is a product of cultural, social and mental processes.

Prison and Probation in Modern Ireland - New Developments

This podcast is taken from the Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar Series held in Glasgow on the 8th May 2008. Professor Ian O'Donnell, Director of the Institute of Criminology, University College Dublin. talks about new developments in criminal justice, including Ideas and concerns about the criminal justice work.