prisons

Gill McIvor, Professor of Criminology, SCCJR; Mary Belgan, Service Manager, 218 Centre; Nancy Loucks, Chief Executive, Families Outside; and Margaret Malloch, Research Fellow, SCCJR, discuss whether women's imprisonment is the best way to deal with female offenders and the possible alternatives.

The safety and security of the law-abiding citizen is a key priority of the coalition government. Everyone has a right to feel safe in their home and in their community. When that safety is threatened, those responsible should face a swift and effective response. People rely on the criminal justice system to deliver that response: punishing offenders, protecting the public, and reducing reoffending.

A functioning correctional system depends on the orderly reproduction of a stable and acceptable prison environment. The argument in this paper has two parts: first, a key factor in the social order of a prison is the legitimacy of the prison regime in the eyes of inmates; and second, the legitimacy of authorities depends in large part upon the procedural fairness with which officers treat prisoners.

Scotland is currently engaged in one of the biggest penal reform projects in a generation, seeking to fundamentally change its approach to punishment, which is characterised by high use of imprisonment compared to other parts of Europe, and the use of very short prison sentences. In Scotland around three quarters of prison sentences handed down by the courts are for six months or less. But because short sentences are seen as minimally intrusive compared to long-term or life sentences, there has been, until now, little research on their effects.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how we should deal with young people behaving badly. In July 2004, the Government announced its new five year plan to tackle crime. Since then there's been much talk of sweeping the streets clean of yobs and cracking down on young offenders. But what is the most effective way of dealing with bad behaviour by young people?

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments, the first on prisons. Laurie Taylor visits England’s oldest prison, the Tower of London, to talk to ex-prison governor and criminologist, Professor David Wilson, about a new project whose aim is to bring fans of prison drama into contact with penal experts and reformers.

This summary sets out the main findings from a review of the recent literature on strategies to tackle illicit drug markets and distribution networks in the UK. The report was commissioned by the UK Drug Policy Commission and has been prepared by the Institute for Criminal Policy Research, School of Law, King’s College London. This review restricted itself to domestic measures for tackling the drugs trade.

Recording of a Glasgow School of Social Work Research Seminar, 19 June 2008. Dr Robin Wilson, Clinical Director, Florida Civil Commitment Centre talking about rehabilitation of sex offenders.

Imprisonment for Public Protection is an indeterminate sentence given to offenders who are categorised as 'dangerous' but whose offences do not carry a life sentence. This report presents the findings of research carried out on the mental health of IPP prisoners and makes recommendations to address problems identified.

Report intended for policy makers interested in prison and sentencing reform. It presents evidence about the situation in Scotland and ideas for future policy development in Scotland. These ideas are based on research presented by academics at a seminar on sentencing reform held 12 December 2008.