crime victims

Research that aims to review the existing evidence and practice surrounding victims’ support needs, outcome measurement and quality assurance in the victim support sector, to assess: 

  • the support needs of victims
  • the effectiveness of interventions to support victims
  • how to develop victim outcome measures or indicators
  • how to measure victim outcomes
  • how to measure and assess quality in support service provision. 

The Scottish Government’s Making Justice Work Programme represents the most significant set of reforms to courts for more than a century. A central objective of the programme is to improve the experience of victims and witnesses, and a commitment has been made to to bring forward a Victims and Witnesses Bill during this Parliament.

The Hate Crimes Project will present new Scottish research on concepts of “hate” crime. It will also provide short summaries, discussion and artwork from multimedia projects.

The site is partially funded by a grant from the Royal Society of Edinburgh and at present it contains links and findings from research carried out, some with colleagues, funded by the RSE, the Clark Foundation and the Scottish Centre for Criminal Justice Research, all of whose support is gratefully acknowledged.

Report that outlines findings of research conducted by Natcen Social Research on victim/survivor and public attitudes to sentencing sexual offences.

Report of the Chief Inspectors of Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI) and Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) into the treatment of young victims and witnesses in the criminal justice system (CJS). It has been undertaken as part of the criminal justice Chief Inspectors’ joint inspection programme for 2010-11.

Document that explores the issues around what makes accommodation safe for child victims of trafficking. ECPAT UK undertook structured face-to-face interviews and a roundtable discussion with a range of professionals, including local authority children’s services, the police, NGOs and organisations accommodating child victims of trafficking, as well as ascertaining the views of the young people themselves. This led to the formulation of 10 child-centred principles concerning the provision of safe accommodation for child victims and/or suspected child victims of trafficking.

A summary of new evidence on the role of advice services in preventing youth offending and the potential impact on crime of cuts to advice services.

The briefing is for providers, planners, researchers and policy makers with an interest in: services for young people; legal advice services; and the youth justice system. It follows a recent JustRights report, Not Seen and Not Heard, revealing the impact of proposed legal aid cuts on children and young people.

Audit that looks at the performance of the principal justice agencies through the eyes of the victims and witnesses who use them.

There are many aspects of our justice system that are very positive – for example, the fall in crime and anxiety, and rise in public confidence – but this audit shows that despite these changes, victims and witnesses are still not treated as well as they should be.

The strategic narrative on Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) published in November 2010 announced that a review of MARACs would be undertaken in order to improve understanding of how MARACs are working and potential areas of development, including considering the case for putting MARACs on a statutory basis. The report presents the key findings of that review.

This thematic assessment was undertaken with four principle objectives:

1. Assess the size and scale of ‘localised grooming’ in proportion to the overall known picture of sexual exploitation
of children under the age of 18 in the UK
2. Establish any patterns of offending profile or victim experience
3. Assess the effectiveness of processes which might help identify such offending or potential victims
4. Recommend action to be taken to reduce the risk in future, including any urgent action that becomes apparent.