crime

This report presents key findings on gang membership and knife carrying amongst a cohort of young people based on data collected by the Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime (ESYTC). The analysis was commissioned in light of a lack of quantitative data measuring the extent of gang membership and knife crime in Scotland.

There is limited reliable evidence relating to the nature, form and prevalence of youth ‘gangs’ and knife carrying in Scotland. Recognising these information shortfalls, this research report seeks to provide an overview of what is known about the nature and extent of youth gang activity and knife carrying in a set of case study locations; provide an in-depth account of the structures and activities of youth gangs in these settings; provide an in-depth account of the knife carrying in these settings; and offer a series of recommendations for interventions in these behaviours.

This article highlights the importance of social and situational context to an understanding of girls’ violence (and to girls’ understanding of violence). The research study that forms the basis of the chapter commenced, in Scotland, against a back-drop of increasing concern in Britain about violence by, and amongst, young people.

This article reviews policy developments in Scotland concerning ‘persistent young offenders’ and then describes the design of a study intended to assist a local planning group in developing its response. The key findings of a review of case files of young people involved in persistent offending are reported.

This article presents some key findings from an exploratory study of teenage girls’ views and experiences of violence, carried out in Scotland. Using data gathered from self-report questionnaires, focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, it conveys girls’ perceptions of violence and discusses the nature and extent of the many forms of violence in girls’ lives.

The Scottish Consortium on Crime and Criminal Justice and the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research held a seminar in Glasgow on 23rd February 2010, to discuss the community payback order, which has been proposed by the Scottish Government in the Criminal Justice and Licensing (Scotland) Bill. The purpose of the seminar was to clarify the intentions behind the proposed new Scottish Order; how its success would be judged; and how it could be made both effective and acceptable, to sentencers, to the press and to the public.

Bulletin that presents statistics on crimes and offences recorded and cleared up by the eight Scottish police forces in 2009-10. It forms part of the Scottish Government series of statistical bulletins on the criminal justice system. Statistics on crimes and offences recorded by the police provide a measure of the volume of crime with which the police are faced.

The SCCJR produces high-quality research which is both scholarly and of relevance to the needs of those involved in the formulation, development and implementation of criminal justice policy. The SCCJR seeks to share its research findings widely and offers training, consultancy and policy advice. The SCCJR works in partnership with a range of stakeholders involved in crime and justice research, policy and practice. This Vimeo resource contains the SCCJR's video content.

Part of the IRISS What Works: Putting Research Into Practice workshops, this podcast details a talk by Professor Fergus McNeill on the range of practices and procedures for dealing with young people involved, or at risk of being involved, in offending. The event was held on Friday, 5th February 2010.