crime

‘Step inside our shoes’: young people's views on gun and knife crime

As part of our Growing Strong campaign, children and young people were consulted on gun and knife crime – how they are affected by it, why they think it happens and what they think the solutions might be. Young people deserve the chance to be heard, to highlight their experiences and to have a role in shaping the solutions to this important issue.

Violent crime: some basic facts and implications for SW practice (Towards effective practice, paper 5)

Paper examining research concerned with adult and youth violent offending with the aim of increasing awareness of the salient issues amongst social work practitioners and those interested from a policy perspective.

Police and racism: What has been achieved 10 years after the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry report?

Ten years on from the publication of the Lawrence Inquiry report, the Equality and Human Rights Commission wanted to consider what progress the police service has made in terms of race equality. This report deals with four main themes: employment, training, retention and promotion; stop and search; the national DNA database; race hate crimes. The findings are discussed under the aforementioned headings and a number of case studies are presented.

Parental drug misuse : a review of impact and intervention studies

This review examines the available research about both the impact of problem drug use and interventions designed to reduce that impact. It starts by looking at definitions, the extent of problem drug use, and its impact across important aspects of children’s lives. The review is intended for social care workers involved with adults – using or affected by drugs – and their children and young relatives.

Review of evidence relating to volatile substance abuse in Scotland

In early 2006, the Scottish Executive Justice Department commissioned a review of the available evidence on volatile substance abuse (VSA) among young people in Scotland, particularly, in relation to the prevalence and nature of VSA, successful prevention of VSA and effective communication of VSA information and messages.

This report details the findings of that review and makes recommendations for the way in which the review of evidence can be used to take forward the volatile substance abuse agenda in Scotland.

Investigating Crime using the British Crime Survey

This resource uses the study of crime in society to show how existing data sources can be utilised, and as such, this project is relevant to a range of social science disciplines, such as sociology, politics, psychology and media studies. The project is also relevant to citizenship studies. The resources can be used for A level syllabi but are also highly applicable for undergraduate and postgraduate learning.

Together we can end violence against women and girls: a consultation paper

Government consultation document intended to raise awareness and generate discussion one what more could be done to end violence against women and girls. The Consultations aims are: to recognise the contribution organisations have made to success in reducing violence against women and girls and supporting victims; raise awareness of the scale and nature of violence against women and girls; generate national debate to identify what would make women and girls feel and be safer; and to test policy proposals and ideas designed to help prevent violence against women and girls.

Hidden harm: next steps

This resource vividly describes the situation of many children and young people living in substance misusing households.

Safe. sensible. social: the next steps in the National Alcohol Strategy

UK Government document reviewing progress since the publication of the Alcohol Harm Reduction Strategy for England (2004) and outlining further action to achieve long-term reductions in alcohol-related ill health and crime.

Scotland’s action programme to reduce youth crime 2002

Action programme aimed at children and young people up to the age of 16 who are offending and at those 17 year olds who are under a statutory supervision requirement. It recognises the need for a more integrated approach between the youth justice and adult criminal justice systems. This report sets out proposals to identify the first steps in achieving this.