crime

Restorative justice is a theory of justice that emphasizes repairing the harm caused or revealed by criminal behaviour. It is best accomplished through cooperative processes that include all stakeholders. Restorative justice theory and programs have emerged over the past 20 years as an increasingly influential world-wide alternative to criminal justice practice. This tutorial provides an overview of the movement and of the issues that it raises.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. In the first Laurie Taylor speaks to Dr Laura Piacentini about her new research on imprisonment in Russia which took her to prison colonies where she lived, shared vodka with the prison officers and listened to recitations of Alexander Pushkin's poetry. There, she discovered that contrary to expectations, the Russian penal system allowed prisoners certain freedoms denied them in British jails.

Ten years on from the publication of the Lawrence Inquiry report, the Equality and Human Rights Commission wanted to consider what progress the police service has made in terms of race equality. This report deals with four main themes: employment, training, retention and promotion; stop and search; the national DNA database; race hate crimes. The findings are discussed under the aforementioned headings and a number of case studies are presented.

This review examines the available research about both the impact of problem drug use and interventions designed to reduce that impact. It starts by looking at definitions, the extent of problem drug use, and its impact across important aspects of children’s lives. The review is intended for social care workers involved with adults – using or affected by drugs – and their children and young relatives.

In early 2006, the Scottish Executive Justice Department commissioned a review of the available evidence on volatile substance abuse (VSA) among young people in Scotland, particularly, in relation to the prevalence and nature of VSA, successful prevention of VSA and effective communication of VSA information and messages.

This report details the findings of that review and makes recommendations for the way in which the review of evidence can be used to take forward the volatile substance abuse agenda in Scotland.

This resource uses the study of crime in society to show how existing data sources can be utilised, and as such, this project is relevant to a range of social science disciplines, such as sociology, politics, psychology and media studies. The project is also relevant to citizenship studies. The resources can be used for A level syllabi but are also highly applicable for undergraduate and postgraduate learning.

Government consultation document intended to raise awareness and generate discussion one what more could be done to end violence against women and girls. The Consultations aims are: to recognise the contribution organisations have made to success in reducing violence against women and girls and supporting victims; raise awareness of the scale and nature of violence against women and girls; generate national debate to identify what would make women and girls feel and be safer; and to test policy proposals and ideas designed to help prevent violence against women and girls.

This resource vividly describes the situation of many children and young people living in substance misusing households.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on criminal policy transfer in view of criminals who increasingly operate across national boundaries and so apparently do ideas of criminal justice.

Laurie Taylor talks to criminologist, Professor Tim Newburn, and considers the claim that crime control policies here and in the United States are converging. The segment is second in the audio clip after a look at economies of design.

This study examined the prevalence and structural correlates of gender based violence against female sex workers in an environment of criminalised prostitution in Canada. The results demonstrate an alarming prevalence of gender based violence against female sex workers. The structural factors of criminalisation, homelessness, and poor availability of drug treatment independently correlated with gender based violence against street based female sex workers.