crime

Literature review that aims to address a gap in our knowledge base around what the public think and feel about the justice system and why, and what consequences this has for the system itself.

Presents new evidence on the causal impact of education on crime, by considering a large expansion of the UK post-compulsory education system that occurred in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

The Transition to Adulthood (T2A) Alliance is a broad coalition of organisations, that evidences and promotes ‘the need for a distinct and radically different approach to young adults in the criminal justice system; an approach that is proportionate to their maturity and responsive to their specific needs.

The T2A Pathway identifies ten points in the criminal justice process where a more rigorous and effective approach for young adults and young people in the transition to adulthood (16-24) can be delivered.

The Hate Crimes Project will present new Scottish research on concepts of “hate” crime. It will also provide short summaries, discussion and artwork from multimedia projects.

The site is partially funded by a grant from the Royal Society of Edinburgh and at present it contains links and findings from research carried out, some with colleagues, funded by the RSE, the Clark Foundation and the Scottish Centre for Criminal Justice Research, all of whose support is gratefully acknowledged.

Report that provides an extensive analysis of media coverage of black young men and boys in the British news and current affairs media.

The central aim of the research is to understand how the news media represent black young men and boys, and specifically, to consider whether there is evidence of negative stereotyping of black young men and boys in the news media.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people's experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on 13,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people’s experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland, based on 13,000 in-home face-to-face interviews conducted annually with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

The results are presented in a series of reports including this one, which provides information on partner abuse. The 2010/11 survey is the third sweep of the SCJS, with the first having been conducted in 2008/09.

Notes from a seminar held on Monday 24th October 2011 at the Nuffield Foundation. The seminar took place as a round-table discussion attended by 28 policy makers, youth justice practitioners, researchers, specialists from children’s organisations and think-tanks. Sara Nathan OBE, a broadcaster and a member of the Judicial Appointments Commission as well as the Independent Commission on Youth Crime, chaired the meeting.

Bulletin which is the first in a series of supplementary volumes that accompany the main annual Home Office Statistical Bulletin, ‘Crime in England and Wales 2010/11’.

Figures included in this bulletin are from the British Crime Survey (BCS), a large, nationally representative, face-to-face victimisation survey in which people resident in households in England and Wales are asked about their experiences of crime in the 12 months prior to interview.

Paper that analyses the relationship between having one or more father figures and the likelihood that young people engage in delinquent criminal behaviour. It pays particular attention to distinguishing the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers.