crime prevention

Video recordings produced as a result of joint work by IRISS and the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) on the topic of recent crime and justice research.

The videos offer short 'research soundbites' based on recent or forthcoming research, and a series of crime and justice discussion recordings which capture academics, policy makers and practitioners talking about key issues around crime and justice in Scotland.

The safety and security of the law-abiding citizen is a key priority of the coalition government. Everyone has a right to feel safe in their home and in their community. When that safety is threatened, those responsible should face a swift and effective response. People rely on the criminal justice system to deliver that response: punishing offenders, protecting the public, and reducing reoffending.

Part of the IRISS What Works: Putting Research Into Practice workshops, this podcast details a talk by Professor Fergus McNeill on the range of practices and procedures for dealing with young people involved, or at risk of being involved, in offending. The event was held on Friday, 5th February 2010.

In March 2008, a new 10 year national drugs strategy document was published: Drugs: protecting families and communities. This new drug strategy presents an agenda which strongly reinforces the main points of the last strategy with its emphasis on crime reduction and community safety. Like its predecessor, it says less about individual health and social outcomes. In the same month the United Kingdom Drug Policy Commission, (UKDPC), an independent think tank, published a major report on the drugs strategy and its key focus criminal justice.

This paper examines the links between early conduct problems and subsequent offending. It makes the case for greatly increased investment in evidence-based programmes to reduce the prevalence and severity of conduct problems in childhood.

Study evaluating a youth crime befriending scheme with particular reference to the processes involved in running the scheme and the effectiveness of its outcomes for young people.

This report presents the findings from a survey of over 1700 young people aged between eight and 17 years old. The survey explored young people's perceptions and opinions on gun and knife crime; the reasons why some young people carry guns and knives; solutions to the problem; perceptions of the local area, safety and relationships with authority figures; the demographic factors that drive differences between groups.

Report identifying ten examples of crime reduction and prevention programmes which have proved effective and cost-effective in countries outwith the UK. These programmes address a combination of risk factors at each stage of a child's development and the report recommends similar programmes should be developed in the UK.