crime

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

It provides a brief introduction to the research evidence about the process of desistance from crime.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring adults’ experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on, annually, 13,000 face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

For more story-based resources, see the Storybank.

Video story of Alan Weaver, a former prisoner who successfully desisted from criminal behaviour. It was produced as part of a project to share knowledge and improve understanding about why people desist from offending.

Research that is a call to action for all services to improve the way we respond to people with mental health problems who have been victims of crime. As one in four of us will experience a mental health problem in any given year, this is an issue that can’t be ignored or dismissed.

Summary that provides an overview of key evidence relating to reducing the reoffending of adult offenders. It has been produced to support the work of policy makers, practitioners and other partners involved in offender management and related service provision. 

Article that highlights the views and advice of offenders in Scotland about what helps and hinders young people generally in the process of desistance, why interventions may or may not encourage desistance and what criminal justice and other agencies can do to alleviate the problems which may result in offending.

Paper that offers an ex-offender's viewpoint on the outlook of many young people today, or what is termed 'Social Deprivation Mindset'. The author also suggests that the criminal justice system should place most of their emphasis on changing the mindset of problematic individuals, rather than placing most of their efforts on challenging their re-offending.

The Edinburgh Study of Youth Transitions and Crime is a programme of research that aims to address a range of fundamental questions about the causes of criminal and risky behaviours in young people.

The core of the programme is a major longitudinal study of a single cohort of around 4,000 young people who started secondary school in Edinburgh in the autumn of 1998.
 

Report that presents research commissioned by Audit Scotland on international levels and experience of reoffending. It aims to set the Scottish experience of reoffending in context and to identify factors which other jurisdictions have seen affect reoffending rates.

Paper that reports the findings of a series of focus groups set up to explore public attitudes to youth crime.

The topics included the respondents‟ views of:
- the extent of crime and anti-social behaviour (ASB) in the local community and the perceived causes of these
- restorative justice
- volunteering and the role of the community in preventing crime and in supporting youth justice.