abuse

This Act of Scottish Parliament came into force after a report in November 2000, by the then Justice and Home Affairs Committee, which concluded that the law afforded inadequate protection to individuals at risk of abuse from other individuals and the desire to give the police more powers to protect such individuals.

This study is one of a series of projects, jointly commissioned by the DCSF and the Department of Health, to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and focuses on recognition of neglect. This literature review aimed to provide a synthesis of the existing empirical evidence about the ways in which children and families signal their need for help, how those signals are recognised and responded to and whether response could be swifter.

JRF’s search to understand and improve the experiences of older people and disabled people in society is central to our work on social policy and practice. This publication is a response to the Department of Health’s consultation on the review of the No Secrets guidance.

Drinking alcohol is very common. For most people, it is an enjoyable part of a party or going out with friends. Most people who drink do not have a drink problem. However, for some children and young people who call ChildLine, alcohol does cause problems. This can be because they are drinking too much. More commonly though, it is because someone they care about – a parent, grandparent, brother, sister, girlfriend, boyfriend or a friend – is drinking too much. For these callers, alcohol is a problem. This is called alcohol abuse.

Consultation developed with the National Reference Group, set up to implement the recommendations of Survivor Scotland.

This paper was designed to draw on the views and experiences of survivors particularly and it was acknowledged from the start that more innovative methods were needed to ensure that this happened. A number of events were held with survivors and survivor organisations to raise their awareness of the consultation and engage them in discussions.

Group and individual interviews were also carried out with survivors, facilitated by survivor organisations.

Report summarising research which showed disabled people's rights to safety and security are often denied them in the UK and setting out the steps the Equality and Human Rights Commission will take to promote disabled people's safety and security.

Every child has the right to grow up in a caring and safe environment. Fortunately most children and young people do. However, some children are not loved by their families. Others live in families that are having a really difficult time and cannot cope with their problems. Some children are deliberately neglected or hurt by the adults around them.

Briefly presents the background to the case of Child K who was admitted to hospital with convulsions and later died. The executive summary then presents the findings and recommendations from the case review.