physical abuse

Document that explains why preventing physical abuse in high risk families is a key focus of the NSPCC's efforts to keep children safe from harm.

There is increasing research and clinical evidence which suggests that there are sometimes inter-relationships, commonly referred to as 'links', between the abuse of children, vulnerable adults and animals. A better understanding of these links can help to protect victims, both human and animal, and promote their welfare.

Animal abuse and child maltreatment: a review of the literature and findings from a UK study critically reviews the body of existing international research literature on the co-existence of animal and child abuse and presents the findings from new research into patterns of animal ownership and the treatment of animals in British families.

Report identifying the extent of partner abuse in Scotland, both since the age of 16 and over a 12-month period. It assesses the nature and impact of partner abuse and explores the extent to which people or organisations were informed about the abuse, in particular contact with the police about the incident.

Bullying is when people are mean to someone or hurt them on purpose. In 2003/04 more than 31,000 children called ChildLine about bullying, making it the most common problem children phone us about. This leaflet presents information on who to contact when you see someone being bullied or yourself are being bullied.

Jointly commissioned report by the Scottish Government and Glasgow City Council of the Independent Inquiry into Abuse at Kerelaw Residential School and Secure Unit.

This resource looks at the question of the impact of domestic violence on children and examines some of the research on intervention and what can be done to promote better outcomes. The review aims examines the definition of domestic violence and the gendered pattern of abuse; the experiences of children living with domestic violence and the overlap with other forms of abuse; the impact on children of living with domestic violence; the problems associated with post-separation violence; and policy implications and practice interventions.

Every child has the right to grow up in a caring and safe environment. Fortunately most children and young people do. However, some children are not loved by their families. Others live in families that are having a really difficult time and cannot cope with their problems. Some children are deliberately neglected or hurt by the adults around them.

Epidemiological studies routinely collect quantitative data on gender differences in drug use (e.g. prevalence, mortality), but far less is published on the qualitative aspects of female drug problems. This review presents quotations gleaned from interviews with women in eight countries. Through these testimonies, the report illustrates how qualitative research can provide glimpses into the experiences and perceptions of women facing drug issues that statistics alone cannot provide.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) involves procedures which include the partial or total removal of the external female genital organs for cultural or other non-therapeutic reasons. FGM has been a specific criminal offence in the UK since the passage of the Prohibition of Female Circumcision Act 1985. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 repealed and re-enacted the provisions of the 1985 Act, gave them extra-territorial effect and increased the maximum penalty for FGM.