emotional abuse

The tragic deaths of Victoria Climbié in 2000 and Peter Connelly in 2007 brought the difficulties of identifying and dealing with severe neglect and abuse sharply into public focus. These children died, following weeks and months of appalling abuse, at the hands of those responsible for caring for them.

The public outcries that followed asked how the many different professionals who had seen these children and their families in the weeks before their deaths could have failed to recognise the extent of the children’s maltreatment.

The tragic deaths of Victoria Climbié in 2000 and Peter Connelly in 2007 brought the difficulties of identifying and dealing with severe neglect and abuse sharply into public focus. These children died, following weeks and months of appalling abuse, at the hands of those responsible for caring for them.

The public outcries that followed asked how the many different professionals who had seen these children and their families in the weeks before their deaths could have failed to recognise the extent of the children’s maltreatment.

The tragic deaths of Victoria Climbié in 2000 and Peter Connelly in 2007 brought the difficulties of identifying and dealing with severe neglect and abuse sharply into public focus. These children died, following weeks and months of appalling abuse, at the hands of those responsible for caring for them.

The public outcries that followed asked how the many different professionals who had seen these children and their families in the weeks before their deaths could have failed to recognise the extent of the children’s maltreatment.

The tragic deaths of Victoria Climbié in 2000 and Peter Connelly in 2007 brought the difficulties of identifying and dealing with severe neglect and abuse sharply into public focus. These children died, following weeks and months of appalling abuse, at the hands of those responsible for caring for them.

The public outcries that followed asked how the many different professionals who had seen these children and their families in the weeks before their deaths could have failed to recognise the extent of the children’s maltreatment.

There is increasing research and clinical evidence which suggests that there are sometimes inter-relationships, commonly referred to as 'links', between the abuse of children, vulnerable adults and animals. A better understanding of these links can help to protect victims, both human and animal, and promote their welfare.

Animal abuse and child maltreatment: a review of the literature and findings from a UK study critically reviews the body of existing international research literature on the co-existence of animal and child abuse and presents the findings from new research into patterns of animal ownership and the treatment of animals in British families.

Report identifying the extent of partner abuse in Scotland, both since the age of 16 and over a 12-month period. It assesses the nature and impact of partner abuse and explores the extent to which people or organisations were informed about the abuse, in particular contact with the police about the incident.

Bullying is when people are mean to someone or hurt them on purpose. In 2003/04 more than 31,000 children called ChildLine about bullying, making it the most common problem children phone us about. This leaflet presents information on who to contact when you see someone being bullied or yourself are being bullied.

Jointly commissioned report by the Scottish Government and Glasgow City Council of the Independent Inquiry into Abuse at Kerelaw Residential School and Secure Unit.

JRF’s search to understand and improve the experiences of older people and disabled people in society is central to our work on social policy and practice. This publication is a response to the Department of Health’s consultation on the review of the No Secrets guidance.