child abuse

The UK Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) is often asked to contribute to national, European and international discussions and initiatives designed to improve responses to tackling child sexual abuse content on the internet. Wherever beneficial it shares our model and expertise with organisations, companies, governments and agencies around the world to enable others to understand how the UK partnership approach and industry self-regulation is successful in the UK, as well as how the range of services provided have helped to minimise online child sexual abuse content in the UK and beyond.

Each year around 20,000 children have their futures decided by the family courts. Baby William Ward was one of them. His parents Jake and Victoria were investigated by police and social services when they were unable to explain a serious injury to their three-month-old son. It took them two years to clear their names and a further three years to win the right to speak completely openly about what happened to their family.

Recording of Professor Kenneth Norrie, Professor of Law, University of Strathclyde speaking at the Fred Stone Memorial Conference, Glasgow, May 2010.

Website resource that aims to support professionals and agencies working in child protection by developing communities of expertise and sharing practice knowledge across Scotland. Initially funded by Scottish Government, it aims to facilitate access to child care and protection expertise to help agencies deal with issues of neglect and abuse.

Agencies, councils or organisations can approach the MARS for help with specific cases or situations where a child death has occurred or there is concern about possible or substantiated injury or abuse.

This training activity consists of 20 case scenarios and staff are asked to identify whether or not each scenario constitutes abuse of neglect. They are also asked to consider the needs of children at each developmental stage. These exercises can be done individually initially but require group discussion to explore issues effectively.

There is increasing research and clinical evidence which suggests that there are sometimes inter-relationships, commonly referred to as 'links', between the abuse of children, vulnerable adults and animals. A better understanding of these links can help to protect victims, both human and animal, and promote their welfare.

Report that highlights the findings of a collaborative research study undertaken by Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP) and the NSPCC’s ChildLine in Scotland service to explore children and young people’s experiences of harmful parental drinking and the concerns they express about the impact this is having on their lives.

This course is a mixture of didactic input and case scenario exercises. It also includes a PowerPoint presentation called 'A Multi Agency Understanding of Child Protection Related to Disability'. The course offers information on the current state of knowledge about the abuse of disabled children and the challenges of their adequate protection. There is then an opportunity for participants to make use of this knowledge using some brief case scenarios. Exercise can last approximately 2.5 hours and is appropriate for groups of 8-25.

Paper highlighting the scale of the problem of runaway young people in Scotland, describing existing services in place to deal with the issue and recommending a national strategy be devised to tackle the problem more effectively.

Animal abuse and child maltreatment: a review of the literature and findings from a UK study critically reviews the body of existing international research literature on the co-existence of animal and child abuse and presents the findings from new research into patterns of animal ownership and the treatment of animals in British families.