child neglect

Neglected adolescents: literature review

This literature review is one of a series of projects jointly commissioned by DCSF and DH to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and explores the concept of ‘neglect’ as it applies to adolescents.

The review draws together information from research in other countries on this topic, and also considers a range of other relevant UK and international literature. It considers the practice, policy and research implications of the literature, and has also informed other products of this project.

Fostering resilience

The aim of this learning object is to introduce learners to a structured approach to the assessment and promotion of resilience in vulnerable children.

Child Abuse

Every child has the right to grow up in a caring and safe environment. Fortunately most children and young people do. However, some children are not loved by their families. Others live in families that are having a really difficult time and cannot cope with their problems. Some children are deliberately neglected or hurt by the adults around them.

After Abuse: Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers

FPG Child Development Institute presented a research document done about all substantiated cases of maltreated infants and toddlers.

Parental drug misuse : a review of impact and intervention studies

This review examines the available research about both the impact of problem drug use and interventions designed to reduce that impact. It starts by looking at definitions, the extent of problem drug use, and its impact across important aspects of children’s lives. The review is intended for social care workers involved with adults – using or affected by drugs – and their children and young relatives.

Good practice guidance for working with children and families affected by substance misuse: getting our priorities right

Not all families affected by substance misuse will experience difficulties. However, parental substance misuse may have significant and damaging consequences for children. These children are entitled to help, support and protection, within their own families wherever possible. Sometimes they will need agencies to take prompt action to secure their safety. Parents too will need strong support to tackle and overcome their problems and promote their children’s full potential.

Protecting children: a shared responsibility - guidance for health professionals in Scotland (September 1999)

This document specifically aims to provide user-friendly information for all health professionals in Scotland. It will be valuable to those who may very rarely come into contact with an abused child or children and their families. It is also an important source of advice for staff who have had more experience in this area and highlights the need for child protection training to be made available for all staff.

Protecting children: a shared responsibility - guidance on inter-agency co-operation

This guidance sets out how agencies and professionals should work together to protect children from abuse and neglect, and to safeguard and promote their welfare. It identifies the roles and tasks of different professionals and agencies involved in tackling child abuse and neglect, and it outlines the role of local Child Protection Committees.

How to assist staff in identifying children at risk of abuse or neglect : training for protection : training activity template

This training activity consists of 20 case scenarios and staff are asked to identify whether or not each scenario constitutes abuse of neglect. They are also asked to consider the needs of children at each developmental stage. These exercises can be done individually initially but require group discussion to explore issues effectively.

Professional and Agency Roles and Responsibilities in Child Protection : It’s Everyone’s Job

This is a small group training exercise involving allocation of responsibilities to agencies involved in protecting children.

It should be completed with a large group plenary for discussion and ‘unpacking’ the issues which arise. It is best used in multi-agency training programmes.