child neglect

The first part of the guidance sets out what is currently known about the extent of parental problem drug use and the impact on children. The second tackles the complex area of confidentiality and offers advice to agencies about when, and how, to share information. Part 3 outlines what agencies need to ask of families when they present with drug problems.

The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the ideas and research evidence on child abuse and child protection in order to inform the work of the child protection review team. It is predominantly a review of UK research evidence. In some areas, however, UK evidence was found to be lacking and reference has been made to research from the US, Australia and elsewhere.

Review to promote the reduction of abuse or neglect of children, and to improve the services for children who experience abuse or neglect. It pays particular attention to the needs of the small number of children whose family or environmental circumstances are so poor that their future wellbeing is placed at serious risk.

This literature review is one of a series of projects jointly commissioned by DCSF and DH to improve the evidence base on recognition, effective intervention and inter-agency working in child abuse and explores the concept of ‘neglect’ as it applies to adolescents.

The review draws together information from research in other countries on this topic, and also considers a range of other relevant UK and international literature. It considers the practice, policy and research implications of the literature, and has also informed other products of this project.

The aim of this learning object is to introduce learners to a structured approach to the assessment and promotion of resilience in vulnerable children.

This news release provides statistical data on children involved in referral; the child protection register; inquiries and case conferences in Scotland for the year ending 31 March 2001. Statistical tables are also included.

Every child has the right to grow up in a caring and safe environment. Fortunately most children and young people do. However, some children are not loved by their families. Others live in families that are having a really difficult time and cannot cope with their problems. Some children are deliberately neglected or hurt by the adults around them.

The government has high-profile child poverty targets which are assessed using a measure of income, as recorded in the Household Below Average Income series (HBAI).

However, income is an imperfect measure of living standards. Previous analysis suggests that some children in households with low income do not have commensurately low living standards.

This report aims to document the extent to which this is true, focusing on whether children in low-income households have different living standards depending on whether their parents are employed, self-employed, or workless.

This review examines the available research about both the impact of problem drug use and interventions designed to reduce that impact. It starts by looking at definitions, the extent of problem drug use, and its impact across important aspects of children’s lives. The review is intended for social care workers involved with adults – using or affected by drugs – and their children and young relatives.