poverty

The Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK Project is funded by the Economic, Science and Research Council (ESRC). The Project is a collaboration between the University of Bristol, University of Glasgow, Heriot Watt University, Open University, Queen’s University (Belfast), University of York, the National Centre for Social Research and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. The project commenced in April 2010 and will run for three-and-a-half years.

In England, 1.2 million school children in poverty do not get free school meals. 700,000 of them – often from poor, working families – aren’t even entitled to this key support. The remaining 500,000 are put off claiming both by systems that clearly single out those receiving free meals, which can lead to teasing and bullying, and by the poor quality of some of the food on offer. This report shows that giving children in poverty a free school meal makes sense on every level.

Paper that gives a statistical snapshot of child poverty in Aberdeen, with a specific focus on income and education, reflecting Save the Children’s key policy calls for the local elections.

E-pamphlet to stimulate debate within the voluntary and community sector about the Big Society and its potential for delivering greater social justice and reducing poverty.

It is made up of six contributions which emerged from a roundtable discussion with some 16 organisations, organised by NPI in November 2011, with various community groups and grantmaking charities.

Educational performance appears to be one of the main barriers which stop people moving out of poverty. Yet studies indicate that poorer children are still failing to achieve their educational potential.

This briefing paper looks at the importance of education for social mobility.

Briefing that draws on evidence from research to show how potential policy decisions in the Budget would affect poor places and people in the UK.

It looks at six issues: raising the income tax threshold; tax credits, work incentives and poverty rates; the ‘mansion tax’ and housing; increasing housing supply; older people; and funding social care.

This report details findings of the Key Family Research Project that ran from October 2009 to March 2010 and used the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA) to map the lives of several families experiencing poverty and social exclusion in the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest.

Paper that provides an overview of the main approaches being taken to the alleviation of rural poverty and rural development as well as exploring whether these approaches have specifically targeted or benefitted rural women.

The paper also identifies some of the key issues still impacting on rural women that need to be addressed both present and future within Northern Ireland.

Report on families in England and Wales with young children under the age of five, and disadvantaged young people in the 16 to 24 age group who are struggling to pay their fuel bills.