poverty

Parents living in poverty face a complex set of factors at individual, family and community levels that make parenting more difficult. In this learning object you will explore a case study of Selina and her family, and in so doing, gain an understanding of some of the difficult choices faced by parents in poverty, as well as support services that could help parents cope. Note: This resource contains audio.

People who have a range of needs including homelessness and mental health and substance use problems, and are involved with the criminal justice system, often live at the margins of our society. This research aimed to examine this group’s abilities to access financial services, their financial management skills and the interplay between key life events, mental health and offending.

Practitioners often have to undertake assessments of children and their families who are living in poverty. To help improve the consistency and quality of these assessments the Government introduced the Framework for the Assessment of children in need and their families (DH, 2000). This learning object lets you explore the framework and its many dimensions. With the help of Barbara, a social worker, you will use the framework to assess the Johnson family, gaining an understanding of how the framework can help you in assessing the needs of children and families in your daily role.

Household incomes are dynamic and families can move in and out of poverty over time, with some of them becoming trapped in a cycle. What causes this kind of ‘recurrent’ poverty and how does it relate to unemployment and low pay? How could these cycles be broken? This report summarises the findings of four projects about recurrent poverty and the low-pay/no-pay cycle and examines relevant current UK policy and practice and suggests ways to create longer-lasting routes out of poverty.

Paper reporting on the proceedings of a conference on the impact ten years of devolution has had on the problems of poverty and inequality in Scotland. The report records the views of the main speakers and contains the recommendations coming out of the conference.

Report inquiring into why the proportion of children living in poverty has risen in a majority of the world's developed economies over the past decade. It seeks to identify the factors pushing poverty rates upwards and why some OECD countries are doing a better job than others in protecting children at risk.

This Framework builds on the good work already underway across Scotland and illustrates progress with actions in support of our shared objectives.

This research studied Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Ghanaian and white English working-age people living with long-term ill health. It found that the effect of long-term ill health in reducing chances of employment was similar across ethnic groups. Individuals with long-term conditions required substantial flexibility in employment, due to pain, fatigue, unpredictable symptoms and health appointments; this could conflict with employers' needs for reliability.

This report from the Social Justice Policy Group, chaired by Iain Duncan Smith, identifies five 'pathways' to poverty and makes proposals for tackling them. These pathways are: educational failure, family breakdown, economic dependence, indebtedness and addictions. A sixth section considers how the third sector might be better supported to help people escape poverty.

This framework complements the Early Years Framework, and Equally Well, the report of the Ministerial Taskforce on Health Inequalities, all of which taken together form a coherent approach to addressing disadvantage in Scotland. This framework builds on the good work already underway across Scotland and illustrates progress with actions in support of our shared objectives.