poverty

Report tracing the changing nature of the family and what that means for parents, children and society with a view to stimulating debate on family policy. It explores the changing face of families in Britain and the impact of these changes on society, public opinion and the role of government. It also highlights the opportunities for policymakers created by the changing demographic, social and attitudinal terrain.

Report looking at the issue of access to insurance for socially-excluded groups. Using research, it makes recommendations for extending access to insurance, especially contents insurance, and seeks to stimulate greater public debate about this issue.

Ministers asked the Take Up Taskforce to develop ways to help local services to support parents to access all their relevant benefit entitlements, in order to help tackle child poverty.

Many poor families are not taking up all of the financial support to which they are entitled and there are particularly low rates of take up by families where at least one parent is working. Lack of awareness of available in-work financial entitlements can present a barrier to parents entering and sustaining work.

Despite tough times ahead, there is still political consensus around the goal to end child poverty. Based on new projections taking account of the recession, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has updated its assessment of what it will take to meet the government targets to halve child poverty by 2010 and eradicate it by 2020.

This report provides an assessment of the impact that childcare policies are likely to and might be able to have on the target of ending child poverty by 2020.

Document examining the current state of the gender equality issue in Europe and recommending courses of action to make more progress towards achieving full gender equality for older people.

The European Union exerts a powerful influence over our lives, but few anti-poverty organisations take an active role in influencing what the EU does. This briefing highlights the role of the EU in relation to social policy, and how organisations can get involved.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at research published in 1960 on social change and kinship patterns in Swansea which showed how extended family networks operate. Forty years on, a group of social scientists decided to replicate the 1960 survey and track the changes that have taken place in that time.

Host, Laurie Taylor, is joined by Professor Nickie Charles, one of the co- authors of the new survey to talk about the ways in which family networks persist despite the instability of 21st century life.

Paper offering a critique of the New Deal scheme for the unemployed in the UK. It argues that the policy can be made more effective if the structure of the welfare-to-work system is changed to more closely reflect economic realities. It recommends aligning the institutions of the welfare-to-work system with the needs of employers and the disadvantaged which should have the effect of providing better jobs for the low-skilled and better workers for the private sector.

The children's hearings system, Scotland's unique system of juvenile justice, commenced operating on 15 April 1971. The system is centred on the welfare of the child. A fundamental principle is that the needs of the child should be the key test and that children who offend and children who are in need of care and protection should be dealt with in the same system. Cases relating to children who may require compulsory measures of intervention are considered by an independent panel of trained lay people.