income

Research on public attitudes to inequality has tended to focus more on revealing attitudes than exploring what motivates them. This study aims to fill some of the gaps in existing research to provide useful insights for practitioners and policy-makers.

In June 2008, the Child Poverty Unit held an event entitled ’Ending Child Poverty: “Thinking 2020”’ at which around 100 stakeholders from across lobby organisations, academic institutions, devolved administrations and local and central Government attended. The event was designed to begin a discussion with stakeholders on the vision for a UK free of child poverty by 2020, and the route by which that could be achieved.

Report of a research project which studied the development of character capabilities contributing to life chances and the factors influencing their development. It concludes that the early years are the critical years in this regard and that parents are, consequently, the principal character builders in society.

Report presenting the responses to a consultation exercise with older people carried out to discover their views and experiences of service provision in England and identifying policy areas which need to change as a result of these findings.

The New Policy Institute has produced its 2009 edition of indicators of poverty and social exclusion in Wales, providing a comprehensive analysis of trends. This is the second update of Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Wales, following the original report in 2005, but is the first to be published in a recession. After reviewing ten-year trends in low income statistics, its focus shifts to unemployment and problem debt.

Surveys suggest that public attitudes towards those experiencing poverty are harshly judgemental or view poverty and inequality as inevitable. But when people are better informed about inequality and life on a low income, they are more supportive of measures to reduce poverty and inequality.

Paper examining the impact of devolution in Scotland on poverty and income inequality for particular groups in Scotland. It outlines how income is distributed across Scotland and aims to make a contribution to debates on what can be done to lessen income inequality.

On 11 March 2009, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation hosted a symposium on Basic income, social justice and freedom, jointly organised with the University of York's School of Politics, Economics and Philosophy. Based on themes from the work of eminent political philosopher Philippe Van Parijs, it discussed his argument for the introduction of a basic income paid unconditionally, without work requirements or means tests.

Paper discussing how women are disadvantaged by the pensions and social security system and arguing for changes which take account of changing work patterns and a recognition that the caring responsibilities often undertaken by women are of value to society as a whole.