low income

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion 2009

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion 2009 is an essential resource for policy-makers and others wanting to take stock of what is happening and understand the challenges ahead. The report is complemented by a comprehensive website which provides updates to graphs, more analyses and links to other relevant sites.

A minimum income standard for the UK in 2010

JRF's annual update, based on what members of the public think people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living.
Over time, changes in prices alter the cost of a minimum standard of living, and changes in social norms will change the 'minimum' that is required. This study considers both of these elements, and updates the budgets to April 2010.
The study reveals:

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Scotland 2010

This report is the latest in the Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion in Scotland series, which has been published every two years since 2002. It is shaped as a response to key developments since the last report was published in 2008. The first of these is the recession, most of which (in terms of the fall in economic activity) occurred in 2008/09. The second is the post-2007 policy framework for poverty in Scotland, in particular Achieving Our Potential.

The aftershock of deindustrialisation : trends in mortality in Scotland and other parts of post-industrial Europe

Report of a study which attempted to improve understanding of the role of post-industrial decline on the health of Scotland through making comparisons between Scotland and other areas of Europe which have experienced a similar process of industrialisation and de-industrialisation.

Food affordability, access and security: their implications for Scotland's food policy - a report by Work Stream 5 of the Scottish Government's Food Forum

As part of the Forum set up by Ministers to develop a National Food and Drink Policy, a group has met to consider issues related with food affordability, food access and food security. The group has reviewed existing evidence on these issues and has developed a series of proposals which it feels could be taken ahead in Scotland.

Sociology of the family

Sarah Cunningham-Burley is Professor of Medical and Family Sociology Public Health Sciences and Co-director of the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships at the University of Edinburgh. She is involved in a range of research, including the Growing Up Scotland cohort study and new qualitative longitudinal study of work and family life. She also conducts research on the social aspects of genetics and stem cell research and is a member of the UK government's Human Genetics Commission.

Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Wales 2009

The New Policy Institute has produced its 2009 edition of indicators of poverty and social exclusion in Wales, providing a comprehensive analysis of trends. This is the second update of Monitoring poverty and social exclusion in Wales, following the original report in 2005, but is the first to be published in a recession. After reviewing ten-year trends in low income statistics, its focus shifts to unemployment and problem debt.

Engaging public support for eradicating UK poverty

Surveys suggest that public attitudes towards those experiencing poverty are harshly judgemental or view poverty and inequality as inevitable. But when people are better informed about inequality and life on a low income, they are more supportive of measures to reduce poverty and inequality.

Poverty and inequalities in Scotland : ten years of devolution

Paper examining the impact of devolution in Scotland on poverty and income inequality for particular groups in Scotland. It outlines how income is distributed across Scotland and aims to make a contribution to debates on what can be done to lessen income inequality.

Basic income, social justice and freedom

On 11 March 2009, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation hosted a symposium on Basic income, social justice and freedom, jointly organised with the University of York's School of Politics, Economics and Philosophy. Based on themes from the work of eminent political philosopher Philippe Van Parijs, it discussed his argument for the introduction of a basic income paid unconditionally, without work requirements or means tests.