low income

This report is the latest in the Monitoring Poverty and Social Exclusion in Scotland series, which has been published every two years since 2002. It is shaped as a response to key developments since the last report was published in 2008. The first of these is the recession, most of which (in terms of the fall in economic activity) occurred in 2008/09. The second is the post-2007 policy framework for poverty in Scotland, in particular Achieving Our Potential.

Research into experiences of lone parents in rural Fife conducted in partnership with Fife Gingerbread. Volunteers from the Fife Gingerbread Buddy programme with experience of lone parenthood were trained as peer researchers and were involved in all stages of the research project, the design, fieldwork and analysis.

The research sought to explore and understand lone parent’s quality of life within rural communities of Fife.

Study that explores disabled children’s experiences of living in low income families. Through interviews and group discussions involving a total of 78 disabled children and young people and 17 parents, the research identifies the difference that income makes to whether disabled children enjoy the rights set out in international law.

Paper that argues that the current measure of child poverty is inadequate, and that it fails to acknowledge that poverty is about much more than a lack of income.

Research demonstrates a negative relationship between worklessness and outcomes for children over and above what would be expected due to other factors, such as material deprivation and low income. This underlines the importance of supporting parents to move into the labour market.

This briefing looks at the importance of employment to social mobility.

Report concerned with the impact of future changes in employment structures and pay patterns on income inequality and poverty.

The report findings suggest that:
• relative poverty and inequality are set to rise by 2020 as a result of changes to the structure of employment and future changes in the tax and benefit system
• absolute poverty is likely to be aff ected very little by those changes
• to mitigate increases in poverty and inequality, a very precise and targeted approach to policy, focusing on households in poverty, will be required.

Report that looks at what has changed in the two-and-a-half years since the last report in 2009. It examines low income, work, benefits and education. What emerges is a complex picture. There has been continued long-term improvement in some areas and persistent problems in others.

There are variations both between and within geographical areas and population groups. In all of this, there is the sense that while the position is no worse than three years ago,it is also no better, and Northern Ireland is now faced by the uncertainties of public sector cuts and welfare reform.

In April 2011, Resolution Foundation started following seven low to middle income families across England to track their financial and economic position and how their lives changed over the course of 12 months. This report summarises their experiences over the year and the key challenges faced by the families.

Report that presents a review of research evidence to help inform voluntary and public sector agencies in the development of services.

It has been produced by About Families, a partnership which seeks to ensure that the changing needs of parents, including families affected by disability, are met by providing accessible and relevant evidence to inform service development.

The report is structured in three sections. Section 1 sets out data on long-term trends in UK female employment and on how the UK measures up internationally. Section 2 drills down into the international data to better diagnose the UK’s specific performance issues on female employment with a particular focus on maternal employment. Section 3 describes what countries with better female employment rates do differently from the UK in terms of public spending on family policy. The note concludes by sketching out some general and high-level strategic implications.