personal finance

Resource allocation systems based upon measures of need are one widely adopted approach to estimating the cost of the individual service user’s care package in a manner directly proportionate to individual need. 

However, some recent studies have questioned the feasibility and utility of such systems, arguing that the relationship between needs and costs cannot be modelled with sufficient accuracy to provide a useful guide to individual allocation. In contrast, this paper presents three studies demonstrating that this is possible.

Discussion paper on why the underpinning notion of self directed support seems to have failed in its ambitions. It also looks at how the concepts of personalisation and personal budgets associated with self-directed support may retain value if interpreted in an appropriate way, delivered through an appropriate strategy.

The Social Policy Research Unit examined how current English adult social care practice balances the interests of service users and family carers, in assessment, planning, on-going management and reviews of personal budgets, particularly when budget-holders have cognitive or communication impairments.

The study examined senior local authority perspectives, everyday practice by frontline staff and experiences of service users and carers.

Handbook for parents of disabled children and young people receiving personal budgets. It contains information, examples of good practice and links to useful documents.

Approaches to making personal budgets work well for older people (including people with dementia) emerged as a high priority and TLAP has committed to do more work in this area.

This report is a first stage. It draws on two key surveys:
1. The ADASS personalisation survey (2012)
2. The TLAP National Personal Budgets Survey (2011) and a review of relevant literature.

Paper that explores the links between recovery and personalisation and demonstrates how both are part of a common agenda for mental health system transformation.

Report which examines the challenges of providing quality care services. It provides a series of case studies from other European countries.

Discussion paper which explores personal health budgets for people receiving NHS Continuing Healthcare. It will be of interest to healthcare professionals whohave a role in NHS Continuing Healthcare or are considering the future implementation of personal health budgets.