benefits

This report summarises the findings of the Final Evaluation of the Working for Families Fund (WFF). WFF, which operated from 2004-08, invested in initiatives to remove childcare barriers and improve the employability of disadvantaged parents who have barriers to participating in the labour market, specifically to help them move towards, into, or continue in employment, education or training. The programme was administered by 20 local authorities (which covered 79% of Scotland’s population), operating through around 226 locally based public, private and third-sector projects.

Report inquiring into why the proportion of children living in poverty has risen in a majority of the world's developed economies over the past decade. It seeks to identify the factors pushing poverty rates upwards and why some OECD countries are doing a better job than others in protecting children at risk.

This research studied Pakistani, Bangladeshi, Ghanaian and white English working-age people living with long-term ill health. It found that the effect of long-term ill health in reducing chances of employment was similar across ethnic groups. Individuals with long-term conditions required substantial flexibility in employment, due to pain, fatigue, unpredictable symptoms and health appointments; this could conflict with employers' needs for reliability.

This framework complements the Early Years Framework, and Equally Well, the report of the Ministerial Taskforce on Health Inequalities, all of which taken together form a coherent approach to addressing disadvantage in Scotland. This framework builds on the good work already underway across Scotland and illustrates progress with actions in support of our shared objectives.

Pamphlet drawing attention to the social damage caused by the asset gap in the UK and arguing that the welfare and tax systems are disempowering for those in poverty and should be used to promote and facilitate self-reliance and independence.

The purpose of this study was to inform the DWP's approach to tackling fraud and error and find practical ways of improving the prompt reporting of changes in circumstances by benefit claimants, covering jobseekers' allowance, income support, housing and council tax benefit and pension credit and exploring awareness of the type of information that needs to be reported, when, which authority should be informed and other factors.