benefits

WorkDirections UK forms part of an international group of companies that has placed over 30,000 people into employment through the provision of innovative, accountable and effective welfare-to-work services.

This discussion paper sets out further detail about how the Government plans to implement the recommendations of the Gregg Review on personalised conditionality and support (published in December 2008). In particular it focuses on the supportive framework we want to put in place to help many more parents with younger children and Employment and Support Allowance claimants to prepare for work. Putting this framework in place should ensure further progress in our aim to support families, promote employment and eradicate child poverty.

Report assessing the extent to which work can contribute to the elimination of child poverty and raising issues which arise if work is viewed as the best way out of poverty.

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults.

This is the seventh in a series of regular reports which began in 1998. Its aim is to provide an independent assessment of the progress being made in eliminating poverty and reducing social exclusion in Britain.

Pamphlet investigating the impact of UK Government policy on four groups of economically inactive people, young people, those aged between 50 and 65, lone parents and disabled people. It concludes schemes such as the New Deal have not worked for these groups and suggests ways in which policy might be made more effective.

The report highlights that the number of children living in severe poverty has risen over the period 2004/05–2007/08, from 11 to 13% of all children (estimating that in 2009 the number of children living in severe poverty remained at 1.7 million). This briefing outlines the key findings of the report and sets out why the UK government needs to refocus its efforts on the poorest children in the UK.

Report investigating the extent of the social and economic costs associated with the issue of socially excluded young people in the UK and concluding that interventions helping young people get into employment, education or training can considerably reduce the costs of social exclusion.

This report summarises the final evaluation report of the Working for Families Fund (WFF) programme from 2004-08. It was carried out by the Employment Research Institute, Napier University, Edinburgh, for the Scottish Government over this period.

Over the four years the budget for WFF was £50 million, a total of 25,508 clients were registered, 53% of all clients (13,594) achieved 'hard' outcomes, such as employment, and a further 13% (3,283) achieved other significant outcomes.

Document setting out the UK Government's strategy for tackling the issues which teenage parents encounter and what measures it expects local authorities and primary care trusts to have in place to improve outcomes for teenage parents and their children.