benefits and personal finance

The Expert Working Group on Welfare was established to review the Scottish Government’s work on the cost of the current benefits system, their plans for delivery of benefit payments in an independent Scotland, and provide views on transitional issues that would be relevant to the continued delivery of benefit payments in the event of independence.

For more story-based resources, see the Storybank.

Website of stories that depicts the impact that welfare reform will have on people.

This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2011.Systematic reviews aim to find as much as possible of the research relevant to the particular research questions, and use explicit methods to identify what can reliably be said on the basis of these studies.

Report that advocates changes to regulation and self-regulation, in business practice and to future commissioning of advice to ensure that disabled people in debt are empowered to engage with creditors and deal with their debt problems.

This paper provides some basic facts about the five main benefits that make up, or add to, the income of the approximately five million out-of-work working-age adults to help inform the debate on public spending cuts.

Counting the Costs 2010 was a survey carried out between February and April 2010 and completed by 1,113 UK respondents. All respondents are parents of disabled children. It comprises open and closed questions and is s a repeat of a survey carried out by Contact a Family in 2008. Additional questions were added to the 2010 survey on the benefits system, working and childcare.

This report presents findings from a qualitative research project carried out as part of a wider evaluation of Jobcentre Plus Pathways to Work. The study was conducted in 2007 and 2008 to explore referral practices and liaison amongst Jobcentre Plus staff and service providers involved in helping incapacity benefits recipients move towards, and into, paid employment. The study was led by the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York in collaboration with the Policy Studies Institute and the National Centre for Social Research.

This reports on the Disability and Carers (DCS) Customer Service Survey 2008. Results showed that overall satisfaction with the DCS continues to be high and that there have been some signs of improvement since the previous year. The report suggests a number of aspects of the service that should be focused on.

Providing tailored one-to-one support to help people back into work has been central to the UK Government's reform of the welfare system. This report argues that a new examination is needed on the role of personal advisers. The report is based on focus groups with service users, in-depth interviews with advisers, surveys of personal advisers and employment providers and a review of the literature. Qualitative analysis is presented to show changes in the ratio of Job Centre Plus advisers to the number of interviews they conducted since the recession began.

The current fuel poverty situation is outlined, including legislation and schemes designed to mitigate it. Some suggestions as to how practitioners can help clients to help themselves with this issue are made.