radio programme

Edition of the "All in the mind" series devoted to the subject of dementia. Professor Julie Williams talks about her pioneering work in genetics, and Simon Lovestone talks about the search for a biomarker in blood. The quality of dementia care in the UK is also discussed.

Edition of this series which includes a feature on the issue of mental health problems and employment.

More or Less is a series of programmes on BBC Radio 4 and is part of the Open2.net website. Open2.net is the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC. More or Less examines the role numbers, statistics and figures play in our everyday lives and considers where these figures come from, what they mean - and how they can shape our lives.

Edition of "All in the mind" which discusses the Bradley Report on mental health problems in prisons. Guests Sean Duggan, Linda Bryant and Sharon Bowman examine different approaches to the problem such as making greater use of diversion schemes.

Following an incident in which a man with schizophrenia killed two people, this programme investigates allegations of widespread problems in community mental health services which are allowing dangerous patients to commit violent offences or harm themselves.

BBC Radio 4 programme with Peter White. The social care watchdog claims the eligibility criteria is ‘flawed’ and in need of ‘immediate change’. Peter White reports from the annual conference of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Care.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the history of the housewife. Laurie Taylor talks to Dr Justine Lloyd, Visiting Fellow in the School of Sociology at the University of Lancaster and co-author of 'Sentenced to Everyday Life - Feminism and the Housewife' which examines the history of the housewife in the 1940's and 1950's, and asks whether she was really more of a feminist than we might think. The segment is second in the audio clip after a discussion on cricket.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how a group of Yorkshire women were determined to save a tradition. For generations the women of Skipton have pegged out their washing on lines strung across the back alley that separates Thornton Street from Clitheroe Street. But when a man complained that this practice prevented him parking his car behind his house, it looked as though this tradition might come to an end. Margaret Hicks has lived in the street all her life and was determined to galvanise a group of women into fighting back.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. In the first Laurie Taylor speaks to Dr Laura Piacentini about her new research on imprisonment in Russia which took her to prison colonies where she lived, shared vodka with the prison officers and listened to recitations of Alexander Pushkin's poetry. There, she discovered that contrary to expectations, the Russian penal system allowed prisoners certain freedoms denied them in British jails.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at research published in 1960 on social change and kinship patterns in Swansea which showed how extended family networks operate. Forty years on, a group of social scientists decided to replicate the 1960 survey and track the changes that have taken place in that time.

Host, Laurie Taylor, is joined by Professor Nickie Charles, one of the co- authors of the new survey to talk about the ways in which family networks persist despite the instability of 21st century life.