learning activity

This resource uses examples drawn from different services and teams to help you think about team working in the context of inter-professional and inter-agency collaboration. It explores some of the conditions that support effective team working and offers opportunities to reflect on contribution as a team member.

This resource recognises that social work/social care are made more complex by the multiple relationships with people and agencies with whom you must collaborate to get your work done. The experiences of a family, the Brooks and the professionals and agencies who work with them, illustrate a ‘model’ designed to help you in planning and reflecting on these multiple collaborations.

This resource explores the process of planning and undertaking an assessment of needs, strengths and risks with the contribution of other professionals. A family case study is used to illustrate the opportunities and challenges of this process and to help you reflect on the skills involved in working with other professionals and with family members.

This resource introduces professional identity as a central factor in interprofessional relationships. It invites users to consider the implications of similarity and difference between professionals and how to sustain identity and practice constructively within collaborative relationships.

This resource invites people to explore different dimensions of interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration (IPIAC) and to hear, early on, from those who use care services and carers speaking about their experiences of effective and ineffective collaboration. It will help develop and review understanding of: what is meant by ‘interprofessional and inter-agency collaboration’ (IPIAC); why collaboration has grown in importance; the kinds of evidence that informs collaboration; and key policy and legislation and their timeline.

This resource explores: how staff, residents and relatives view of risk and risk-taking will influence decisions about restraint; how making good decisions about restraint is more likely if care staff are positive, show teamwork, keep good records, are aware of the alternatives to restraint and have some basic knowledge of the law on restraint; and how a careful five-step process can help when making difficult decisions about restraint: observe, do some detective work, come to a collective decision, implement and review the plan.

This resource explores the ideas that: restraint can be a difficult issue in care homes, and the word means different things to different people; there are many different types of restraint, ranging from active physical interventions to failing to assist a person; minimising the use of restraint is important, but sometimes it will be the right thing to do; and knowing the individual, valuing the views of relatives and working as a team will help reduce the need for restraint.

Resource that will further the understanding of the emotional dimension of dementia; the importance of effective strategies to help people experiencing difficult emotions; and explore a range of situations where we can have a major impact on a person with dementia through our actions.

Resource that furthers understanding of how dementia affects each individual differently; four common areas of difficulty faced by people with dementia; practical strategies to assist with difficulties; and difficulties faced by people with dementia not caused by damage to the brain, but by other factors.

Multimedia resource that will further understanding of views of dementia in the media; facts and common misconceptions about dementia; and common symptoms, clinical terminology and causes of symptoms.