interview

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series asks if single parents should have to seek work to get benefits. As the Government launches further pilot projects to encourage lone parents to return to work, Woman's Hour asks whether incentives or sanctions are more effective in getting parents back into the labour market.

David Willets, Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary and Kate Stanley, Head of Social Policy at the Institute for Public Policy Research discuss whether lone parents with secondary school aged children should have to seek work in order to claim benefits.

In this episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series, following the interview with Sociologist James Stockinger in September 2004, Professor Peter Nolan talks to Laurie Taylor on the uniqueness of the British the public sector ethos and finds out why its employees, despite being the most motivated, are the most demoralised sector of the workforce. This segment is second of three discussions in the audio clip.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at the 100,000 children under 16 living in the UK who run away from home. We hear from a woman whose twelve year old daughter persistently ran away and was frequently returned to the family home by the police. Jill Colbert from the Safe in the City project in Salford - who works with young runaways - and John Wheeler from Childline will be joining Jenni Murray to discuss the difficulties that parents of runaways can face in accessing help.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the female sex industry. Prostitution, an industry reckoned to be worth more than £770m a year in the UK, employing an estimated 80, 000 women in Britain, is scheduled for its first comprehensive overhaul in fifty years.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how being a lesbian has changed. Jenni Murray talks to Clare Summerskill about her new play, Gateway to Heaven which is based entirely on the memories of older lesbians and gay men. Their stories are an eye-opener on a time when lesbians and gay men were significantly more constrained, both legally and socially, than they are today.