case study

Healthier Wealthier Children: case studies

Case studies of how Healthier Wealthier Children has been able to assists families struggling with money worries in difficult circumstances. The case studies have been provided from North, East, South East and South West Glasgow, Inverclyde and Renfrewshire. They exemplify the work being undertaken by Healthier Wealthier Children across NHSGGC.

Assets in action: illustrating asset based approaches for health improvement

Research that profiles the work of 19 projects with the aim of illustrating how asset-based approaches are being supplied in Scotland.

The case studies highlight the key characteristics of asset-based working and demonstrate the strengths and challenges of the approach for individuals, the wider community and project staff.

Preparing young people who are looked after for independence in adulthood: Libertas Children's Home

Case study about developing good relationships between young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties and staff in a residential children’s home.

Another way: transforming peoples' lives through good practice in adult social care

Good practice report which offers snapshots - case studies from VODG member organisations - depicting the core issues that help improve the lives of vulnerable people.

The group of people that concerns this report include those with severe and complex needs, with sensory impairments or who have a autistic spectrum disorder.

Safeguarding adults: a community case study

Video case study about John, a 50 year-old man with Asperger's syndrome. He was being exploited by a group of young girls in the community. John has the capacity to make decisions for himself and clearly felt he was getting something from his relationship with one of the girls. He was also giving her money on a regular basis.

People who knew John were concerned for him. With support from his mother, his employer, his social worker and the police he was able to stop giving money to the girl. The girl was warned off by the police, but John really misses his relationship with her.

Empowering vulnerable children and their parents using Talking Mats

Case study which describes the use of Talking Mats at Stenhouse Child and Family Centre (Edinburgh City Council) with very young, vulnerable children and their parents.

Talking Mats is a low-tech communication tool originally developed by the Alternative and Augmentative Communication Research Unit to support people with communication impairment including those with stroke, learning disability and dementia.

Devon multi-agency safeguarding hub: case study report

Study that focuses on Devon's Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH), including: the rationale for setting up the MASH; how the MASH model works; the key challenges to establishing it; how transferable the MASH model is; and its impact.

Dunfermline Advocacy Initiative (DAI)

Dunfermline Advocacy Initiative (DAI) was founded in 1992. It brings together people who need advocates and responsible, committed people to be advocates. The advocates’ role is to get to know their ‘partners’ so that they can help them say what they want to say, and achieve what they want to achieve.

Autism Rights Group Highland (ARGH)

Autism Rights Group Highland (ARGH) was formally constituted on May 1st 2007 and has continued as a collective advocacy group. ARGH is a group run by and for autistic adults. As such all full members including the management committee are autistic.

Since being formed ARGH has continued to work to strengthen the voice of autistic adults within Highland. We have three main aims that we strive to adhere to, both within ARGH and in our everyday lives:

National Involvement Network (NIN)

The National Involvement Network is a loose group of people with learning disabilities who are supported by different organisations across Scotland. What group members have in common is that they want to have more say over the services they use. One of the biggest achievements they have made is a publication called the Charter for Involvement. This book shows clearly what kind of involvement people who use services want. The National Involvement Network has succeeded in getting a lot of provider organisations to sign up to this Charter.