statistics

Bulletin that provides information on homelessness applications, assessments and outcomes to 31 March 2012. It includes information on the characteristics of applicant households, local authority assessments and the action taken in respect of cases that were concluded.

Snapshot data on households in temporary accommodation at 31 March 2012 are presented and notifications of households at risk of homelessness due to eviction/repossession.

Article that looks at the data included in this release, outlining the methods and definitions before moving on to analyse the data for the last couple of years.

The results show that the financial crisis and subsequent recession had a significant impact on households.

The Scottish Crime and Justice Survey (SCJS) is a large-scale continuous survey measuring people's experience and perceptions of crime in Scotland. The survey is based on 13,000 in-home face-to-face interviews with adults (aged 16 or over) living in private households in Scotland.

Document that offers a start point for the LocalGovernment Association (LGA) commissioned researchto inform the Hidden Talents programme. It reviewsavailable statistics, data and commentary to establish what can be reasonably deduced to inform policy and work in response to young people aged 16–24 years who are not in employment, education or training (NEET).

Document which is the first issue of an annual summary of statistics bulletin that brings together information from the following sources:

- Children looked after statistics, 2010-11
- Child protection statistics, 2010-11
- Secure care and close support accommodation statistics, 2010-11.

Bulletin that presents annual statistics on the number of families by type, people in families by family type and children in families by type.

A family is a married, civil partnered or cohabiting couple with or without children, or a lone parent with at least one child. Children may be dependent or nondependent.

Types of family include married couple families, cohabiting couple families and lone parent families.

A statistics publication on mortality rates for 2010. The age-standardised mortality rates in the UK for males and females were 655 and 467 deaths per 100,000 population respectively, the lowest rates ever recorded.

Between 1980 and 2010 age-standardised mortality rates for males and females have declined by 48 per cent and 39 per cent respectively. Male mortality rates have been higher than females
throughout the 30 year period, but because rates for males have fallen at a faster rate, the gap between male and female mortality has decreased.