research report

Small scale, largely qualitative review of the community childminding schemes offered through the auspices of the Scottish Childminding Association (SCMA) that was commissioned to consider the benefits of these services for children, families and society.

Community childminding in Dumfries and Galloway and in Aberdeen is briefly reviewed but, at the suggestion of SCMA, it also focused on community childminding in two particular cases – Scottish Borders Supported Childminding Scheme and Edinburgh Working for Families Scheme.

Report that demonstrates the impact of both Fife and Stirling Community Childminding Services that are funded by the Scottish Government's Early Years Action Fund, administered by Inspiring Scotland.

First in a series of papers which lay out the third sector’s vision and ambitions for the Scotland of the future as we journey towards next year’s referendum and beyond. It reflects thinking and ideas from across the sector and is intended as the starting point for ambitious discussions about the future of welfare in Scotland.

Report that sets out the findings of the overview, examining deaths in children aged one to 18 years in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland from 1980 to 2010.

Research that is part of JRF’s focus on the links between poverty and ethnicity, and examines the role of workplace cultures in routes out of poverty for people of all ethnicities.

With a high representation of ethnic minorities in low-paid work, and falling demand for low-level skills, this publication reveals the need for skills development and career progression for all employees.

Report that is an output of a 15 month design research project carried out by the Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design at the Royal College of Art, in partnership with BT and Scope as part of the BT Better Future Program.

Report that shows how children’s centres have steadily grown in number and reach since their original purpose as highly targeted forms of intervention in 1997. Since 2010 there has been a pressure from government for them to re-focus their attention.

This research shows that under the new model of funding, expenditure on Children’s Centres has fallen since 2010 by an estimated 28%.

Services for disabled youngsters and their families have declined significantly across Scotland as the impact of public sector cuts is felt, according to a new report produced for Scotland’s Commissioner for Children & Young People.

It Always Comes Down to Money examines changes in the availability and accessibility of publicly-funded services for families with disabled children over the past two years.

Research project commissioned by Scottish Government Children and Families Analysis with the objective of undertaking an in-depth analysis of data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to examine the circumstances and outcomes of children living with a disability in Scotland.

The overall aim of this analysis was to explore the impact of disability on the child, their parents and the wider family unit.